Women in International Law Interest Group Networking Breakfast

The Women in International Law Interest Group (WILIG) at the American Society of International Law Annual Networking Breakfast will take place on Thursday, August 9th, from 8:30 am – 9:30 am, at Tillar House (ASIL Headquarters), located at 2223 Massachusetts Ave NW in Washington, D.C.  For more information about the networking breakfast, as well as how to register, please see here.

This year’s speakers include:

Dawn Yamane Hewitt, Quinn Emanuel

Nneoma Veronica Nwogu, World Bank

Teresa McHenry, Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section, Department of Justice

Melanie Nezer, Senior Vice President, Public Affairs, HIAS

Shana Tabak, WILIG Co-Chair, Tahirih Justice Center (moderator)

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Register now for inaugural Women’s Leadership in Academia Conference, to be held July 19-20 at Georgia Law

Women law professors, librarians, and clinicians in, or interested in, leadership positions are invited to take part in the inaugural Women’s Leadership in Academia Conference, to be held July 19-20, 2018, at my home institution, the University of Georgia School of Law in Athens, about 65 miles northeast of Atlanta.

Keynote speakers will be Kellye Testy, former Dean of the University of Washington School of Law, who serves as President and CEO of the Law School Admission Council (LSAC is a conference sponsor), and Professor Libby V. Morris, Director of the Institute of Higher Education and Zell B. Miller Distinguished Professor of Higher Education, as well as a former interim provost, at the University of Georgia.

Session speakers will include IntLawGrrls contributor Hari M. Osofsky, Dean at Penn State Law; Sonja West and Emma Hetherington, Georgia Law; RonNell Anderson Jones, Utah Law; Dahlia Lithwick, Slate; Mary-Rose Papandrea, North Carolina Law; Lisa Radtke BlissAndrea A. Curcio, and Jessica Gabel Cino, Georgia State Law; Raye Rawls, University of Georgia J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development; Claire Robinson May, Cleveland State Law; KerryAnn O’Meara, University of Maryland College of Education;  Tim McFeeley, Isaacson, Miller; Lucy A. Leske, Witt/Kieffer; Laura Rosenbury, Dean at Florida Law; Hillary Sale, Washington University-St. Louis Law; and Melanie Wilson, Paula Schaefer, and Joy Radice,  Tennessee Law.

The conference will focus “on building skills and providing tools and information that are directly applicable to women in legal education looking to be leaders within the academy.” As detailed in the full conference program, session topics will include:

  • #MeToo and the Legal Academy
  • Exploring the Value of Female Mentoring Relationships to Cultivate Law School Leadership
  • Strategies for Conflict Management and Dialogue
  • Engendering Equality Within Your Institution: Establishing a Women’s Committee to Achieve Meaningful Change
  • Addressing Gender Disparities in Institutional Service Workloads
  • Academic Search Process Panel
  • Negotiation Strategies
  • Leadership Challenges and Solutions over the Course of a Career
  • Deans Panel

For registration and other details, see here. And act now: the hotel bloc will close in a few days.

Call for papers: Making international law work for women post-conflict- new voices

Transition from conflict to durable peace, defined as more than merely an absence of hostilities, is without the doubt a key priority for states emerging from conflicts and situations of gross human rights violations. International law plays a major part in this complex process. However, feminist international lawyers have argued that the discipline of international law has been largely developed by men and in ways which reflect male experiences, therefore legitimising women’s unequal position both in the context of international law as well as in national and international affairs.

Traditionally, international law focused on the position of women in wars exclusively from the perspective of international humanitarian law, emphasizing special protection afforded to women (predominantly as civilians) during armed conflict. However, in recent years, more attention has been paid to the applicability of international law to post-conflict situations, including women in the context of conflict prevention, transitional justice and post-conflict reconstruction. For instance, the landmark General Recommendation 30 (2013) of the CEDAW Committee confirmed that ‘protecting women’s human rights at all times, advancing substantive gender equality before, during and after conflict and ensuring that women’s diverse experiences are fully integrated into all peacebuilding, peacemaking, and reconstruction processes are important objectives of the Convention’. Furthermore, questions of gender dimensions of transitional periods, as well as matters concerning gender, peace and security have been at the forefront of academic as well as institutional debates concerning international law, women and post-conflict situations.

Nevertheless, current developments have been largely focused on issues of conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) and prosecution of gender-based crimes largely to the exclusion of other branches of international law, such as international refugee law or international economic law, and their application to women & post-conflict situations.

For instance, issues such as gendered impact of post-conflict migration, the impact of post-conflict economic policies on women, provision of effective and gender-sensitive reparations and securing women’s socio-economic rights have been addressed to a much lesser extent than criminal accountability for CRSV.

This workshop seeks to bring together early career researchers to explore new perspectives on international law, women and post-conflict situations. It will address the multifaceted challenges facing women in post-conflict situations and to explore ways in which international law can (and should) be put to work in order to effectively assist women and secure their rights in the aftermath of contemporary conflicts. Contributions which explore the interdisciplinary perspectives on this theme as well as those which reach beyond the question of accountability for CRSV are particularly welcome.

The workshop will also present an opportunity for early career researchers to share their research with experts in the field of international law, women, peace and security.

Deadline: Titles and abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent with a biography of no more than 100 words to Dr Olga Jurasz (il.newvoices@gmail.com) by 10am GMT on Monday 25 June 2018.

Participants will be asked to provide draft papers (4000 – 4500 words) in advance of the workshop.

Workshop: The workshop will be held on 26 and 27 November 2018 at Amnesty International, Human Rights Action Centre in London.

Eligibility: This is the workshop for early career researchers (max. 8 years from the award of a PhD or equivalent professional / research experience). Participation of early-career researchers from the Global South and conflict-affected countries is particularly welcome.

Funding: A limited number of travel & local accommodation grants are available for participants who are invited to present and would otherwise be unable to participate. Priority will be given to participants from the Global South and conflict-affected countries. If you wish to apply for a travel grant, please send the attached travel grant application together with your abstract. Please note that applications are considered on a case-by-case basis.

IL new voices – travel grant application

Outputs: Selected papers from the workshop will be published in an edited collection in 2019.

This workshop is supported by funding from the British Academy and from the Open University Citizenship & Governance Strategic Research Area.

IL New voices Workshop CFP

 

Call for Panel Proposals – International Law Weekend 2018

International  Law Weekend 2018 will take place from October 18-20 in New York City, at the NYC Bar Association and at Fordham Law School.  This conference is jointly organized and sponsored by the American Branch of the International Law Association and the International Law Students Association.  This year’s theme is “Why International Law Matters.”  Please see the theme description below:

Like any legal system, international law is a reflection of the past. Its norms, rules, and institutions are built upon a foundation that is moored in prior decades and steeped in previous centuries. And yet, international law plays an important role today, while setting the stage for the future. Current developments and emerging trends will form into future law. International lawyers must, therefore, serve as both historians and fortune tellers, while applying international legal norms in the present. How does the past inform our present? What current events and movements will most impact our future? And why does international law matter today? Wading through these moments in time, panels at ILW 2018 will consider the past, reflect on the present, and survey the future of our discipline and our profession, while addressing the fundamental question of why international law matters.

For more information, as well as for how to submit a panel proposal, please see here.  Panel proposals are due on May 25th.

INVITATION TO BOOK LAUNCH

BOOK LAUNCH

The African Foundation for International Law  and the International Institute of Social Studies at Erasmus University, kindly invites you to the launch of ‘International Courts and the African Woman Judge: Unveiled Narratives’ and a Panel Discussion at the International Institute of Social Studies.

Date:    May 7, 2018

Time:   18:00-20:00

Venue:   Erasmus University, International Institute of Social Studies,  Rotterdam,  The Netherlands.

Event details and a flyer with link to registration can be found here: The Hague2018.

                          The event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow.

Women’s leadership in academia focus of Georgia Law event January 5, AALS annual meeting

Law professors, librarians, and clinicians “interested in advancing women into leadership positions within the academy” are invited to take part in a special University of Georgia School of Law reception at next week’s annual meeting of the Association of American Law Schools.

As described in the AALS program, the event will be held January 5, 2018 from 5:30-7:00 pm at the Manchester Grand Hyatt, Level 4, America’s Cup CD, San Diego, California.

University of Georgia Provost Pamela Whitten (left) will give a presentation at the reception, which will also feature breakout discussions led by Kristi L. Bowman (right), Vice Dean for Academic Affairs at Michigan State University College of Law, and Usha R. Rodrigues (below right), Associate Dean for Faculty Development at the University of Georgia School of Law.

o-sponsoring are the AALS Section on Women in Legal Education and the AALS Section Associate Deans for Academic Affairs and Research.

Kudos to my colleague Usha, the principal organizer of this event. It’s a followup to the Roundtable Discussion on Women’s Leadership in Legal Academia that Georgia Law hosted at last year’s AALS one of many Georgia Women in Law Lead (Georgia WILL) events last academic year. As Usha explains in her invitation:

“This event will kick off programming for a new Women in Academic Leadership Initiative. In conjunction with the law schools of Brigham Young University, Michigan State University, UCLA, University of Tennessee, University of Virginia, and Yale University, we are spearheading a program that will feature regional leadership conferences aimed at preparing women in legal education for leadership opportunities and advancement.

“This initiative is in response to valuable feedback from the Roundtable Discussion on Women’s Leadership in Legal Academia we held during last year’s AALS Annual Meeting. Our colleagues expressed a need for a sustained project to foster women’s leadership. Based on that feedback, we have been developing a conference to address needs such as negotiation skills, conflict management, and effective communication. We are also creating panels to discuss various leadership roles and the competitive search process. The inaugural conference, to be held at the University of Georgia on July 19-20, 2018 …”

Details here and here.

Go on! Women in Arbitration Panel in D.C.

trunks.jpgGo On! makes note of interesting conferences, lectures, and similar events.

► The Women in International Law Interest Group of ASIL along with Georgetown International Arbitration Society and DC Women in International Arbitration will host a breakfast panel on “Women in Arbitration” which will be held on Wednesday January 10, 2018 from 8:30 to 10:30am at ASIL Headquarters, Tillar House in Washington, D.C. 

To RSVP click here.