Work On! The New York International Law Review’s 30th Anniversary Symposium

Description

The Symposium & Dinner celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the New York International Law Review (NYILR) by examining the unique role of New York State in international legal practice. This Symposium will bring together the lawyers, judges, scholars, arbitrators, policy makers and activists who engage in this global practice of law in New York. These experts will address how New York leads in these areas of international practice – where it succeeds, where it falls short and what trends in international practice we are likely to see in the decades ahead.

You may register for either or both events. Dinner is $125. The symposium is free, however registration is required.

Thursday, April 12 Dinner ($125)

Dinner will be held at the New York Athletic Club on Thursday, April 12, 2018 beginning at 6:30 pm. Space is limited. Please RSVP early.

6:30 p.m.— Cocktail Reception (President’s Room)

7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. — Dinner (Olympic Suites 1-5)

Dinner Speaker: D. Stephen Mathias, Assistant Secretary-General for Legal Affairs at United Nations

Friday, April 13 Symposium (Free)

The Symposium will be held on Friday, April 13, 2018 at St. John’s University School of Law, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Queens, NY.

The entire day’s program will also qualify for 4.5 non-transitional practice CLE credits with an additional $75 payment. If you want CLE credit, please 1. Register on this site and 2. Download and return the CLE form. (St. John’s University School of Law has been certified by the New York State Continuing Legal Education Board as an Accredited Provider of Continuing Legal Education in the State of New York.)

8:30 a.m.- 9:15 a.m. — Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:15 a.m. — Introductory Remarks

Professor Peggy McGuinness, Director of LL.M. in Transnational Legal Practice Program &
Co-Director of St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law

9:30 a.m.- 11:10 a.m. — Panel One: New York and Cross-Border Dispute Resolution

This panel will address the ways in which New York law has become the standard law to apply to international commercial contracts – how New York courts and, increasingly, New York mediation and arbitration providers have become leaders in cross-border dispute resolution.

Moderator: Nancy M. Thevenin, Esq., Chair of the New York State Bar Association International Section & Adjunct Professor of Law at St. John’s University School of Law

Panelists: E. Alexandra Dosman, Dosman Law & New York International Arbitration Center; James P. Duffy IV, Esq., Partner, Baker & McKenzie, New York, NY; Anibal Martin Sabater, Esq., Partner, Chaffetz & Lindsey LLP, New York, NY; Yasuhiro Saito, Esq., Partner at Saito Law Group PLLC, New York, NY

11:20 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Panel Two: International Deals and Investment in New York

Panelists will discuss how New York serves as the center of international deal making, including cross-border mergers and acquisitions, real estate development and investment, and international licensing of intellectual property. Panelists will also address challenges to New York legal primacy from other financial centers in Europe, China and elsewhere.

Moderator: Professor Christopher J. Borgen, Co-Director of St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law

Panelists: Richard F. Hans, Esq., Managing Partner and Global Co-Chairman of Financial Services Sector DLA Piper, New York, NY; Mark A. Meyer, Esq., Member, Herzfeld & Rubin, P.C., New York, NY; Christina Tsesmelis, Esq., Head of Global Anti-Corruption and AML, Privacy Officer at Neuberger Berman; Amanda Rottermund, Esq., Withersworldwide, New York, NY

1:15 p.m.-2:25 p.m. — Lunch

Lunch Speaker and Recipient of Award for Distinction in International Law and Affairs: Judge Iris Yassmin Barrios Aguilar, President, Guatemala High Risk Court

2:30 p.m.- 4:10 p.m. — Panel Three: Global Politics and Public International Law in New York

Panelists will discuss New York’s participation and influences in global problems and how solutions are reached through international cooperation and international law, particularly in the areas of efforts to address environmental harms, human rights, and terrorism.

Moderator: Professor Peggy McGuinness, Director of LL.M. in Transnational Legal Practice Program & Co-Director of St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law

Panelists: Anil Kalhan, Esq., Associate Professor of Law at Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law & Chair of International Human Rights Committee at New York City Bar Association; Sarah Friedman, Esq., General Counsel for the Mayor’s Office for International Affairs; JoAnn Kamuf Ward, Esq., Director of the Institute’s Human Rights in the US Projector at Columbia Law School

4:15 p.m-5:30 p.m. — Cocktail Reception

You may register here.

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Work On! ICCT Advanced Summer Programme

Work On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 8.43.00 PMThe International Centre for Counter Terrorism with the T.M.C. Asser Institute is hosting an Advanced Summer Programme on August 28-September 1, 2017, at The Hague. Theme is “Countering Terrorism: Legal Challenges and Dilemmas.” Deadline to register is July 23, 2017. Details here. Preliminary programme here.

New research tool (includes blog posts); OUP welcomes feedback

Thanks to our colleague John Louth, Editor-in-Chief for Academic Law at Oxford University Press, for alerting us to the Press’ new, and free, online research tool.

Called ResearchTrack,  it’s designed to help scholars stay abreast of works in their fields, produced not just by OUP but by all publishers. Catalogued are books and journal articles, plus as well as blog posts that treat substantive legal issues.

The beta, which concentrates on Public International Law and International Relations, made its debut here.  It’s well worth a look, and OUP welcomes feedback.

Work On! 2nd Annual “Revisiting the Role of International Law in National Security” Workshop

notes_croppedWork On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

► The International Committee of the Red Cross’s Delegation in Washington along with the faculty at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, Stanford Law and Cardozo Law are hosting the 2nd Annual “Revisiting the Role of International Law in National Security” workshops on May 18th, 2017 at Cardozo Law School in New York City, USA. The theme’s aim is to drive Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 11.54.37.pngdiscussions of public international law, including international criminal law, into conversations (in the U.S. in particular) on national security issues and situations of armed conflicts. There is also an invitation to submit an abstract or draft f article for discussion at the workshop. Deadline for submissions is Monday March 6, 2017. For more details click here.

Work On! Call for Applications for the Venice Academy of Human Rights

notes_croppedWork On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

►  The European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratization has opened the Call for Applications for the Venice Academy of Human Rights on July 3 to July 12th, 2017, at the Monastery of San Nicolò, Venice – Lido, Italy. Theme is “Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities.” Deadline to register is April 19, 2017. Details Here.

 

Work On! Siracusa International Institute for Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The Siracusa International Institute (SII) will host a specialisation course for junior prosecutors on internaitonal criminal justice and international cooperation in criminal matters on July 3-14, 2017, at SII in Siracusa, Italy. Deadline for applications is March 31, 2017. Details here

Additionally, the SII will hold a specialization course in international criminal law for young penalists (“The International Criminal Court at fifteen”) on May, 21-31, 2017  at SII. Deadline for applications is March 20, 2017. Details here.

Not-marchers on the march

nobloodforoilSo, I don’t march.

I stayed home when millions protested the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. Stayed home for “No Blood for Oil” too (though I did have the T-shirt, at left). Avoided the streets of my Paris sabbatical home on May Day 2002, when half a million marched to the chants of “Là-Bas Le Pen.”

Pretty much avoided all public demonstrations since childhood, never having really seen the point of taking to the streets instead of concrete action – that is, instead of litigating/teaching/reasoning/writing/policymaking toward lasting solutions.

So why march today?

► Because the promise of the election of Barack Obama – hands down, the best President of my lifetime – so soon was dashed by never-believed yet oft-repeated undercuttings of his citizenship. The spurious claims and the events that ensued sunk the hope that had lifted many of us in 2007 and 2008. Fell particularly hard on those of us who are immigrants, or who count immigrants among our loved ones.

aliceroom3Because in the last years we’ve been forced to swallow bile: cruel falsehoods about the 1st woman to be nominated by a major U.S. political party; harsh slaps against everyone who has endured sexual assault; soulless insults about every disadvantaged group imaginable.

► Because Looking-Glass intrigue belongs to the fantasy world of Lewis Carroll, not to the real world in which we all must live.

Because aspirations to human dignity, equality, liberty, and justice, without borders, will not withstand anti-“globalist” attack unless those of us who hold these values dear come to their defense.

Because if we fail to object, we fail our children.

To quote other ‘Grrls:

“It seems like a day when numbers matter.”

“I couldn’t not go.”

And so even we not-marchers march, in D.C., in Philadelphia, and, at last count, in nearly 700 other places around the world.

march