Work On! ICCT Advanced Summer Programme

Work On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 8.43.00 PMThe International Centre for Counter Terrorism with the T.M.C. Asser Institute is hosting an Advanced Summer Programme on August 28-September 1, 2017, at The Hague. Theme is “Countering Terrorism: Legal Challenges and Dilemmas.” Deadline to register is July 23, 2017. Details here. Preliminary programme here.

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New research tool (includes blog posts); OUP welcomes feedback

Thanks to our colleague John Louth, Editor-in-Chief for Academic Law at Oxford University Press, for alerting us to the Press’ new, and free, online research tool.

Called ResearchTrack,  it’s designed to help scholars stay abreast of works in their fields, produced not just by OUP but by all publishers. Catalogued are books and journal articles, plus as well as blog posts that treat substantive legal issues.

The beta, which concentrates on Public International Law and International Relations, made its debut here.  It’s well worth a look, and OUP welcomes feedback.

Work On! 2nd Annual “Revisiting the Role of International Law in National Security” Workshop

notes_croppedWork On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

► The International Committee of the Red Cross’s Delegation in Washington along with the faculty at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, Stanford Law and Cardozo Law are hosting the 2nd Annual “Revisiting the Role of International Law in National Security” workshops on May 18th, 2017 at Cardozo Law School in New York City, USA. The theme’s aim is to drive Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 11.54.37.pngdiscussions of public international law, including international criminal law, into conversations (in the U.S. in particular) on national security issues and situations of armed conflicts. There is also an invitation to submit an abstract or draft f article for discussion at the workshop. Deadline for submissions is Monday March 6, 2017. For more details click here.

Work On! Call for Applications for the Venice Academy of Human Rights

notes_croppedWork On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

►  The European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratization has opened the Call for Applications for the Venice Academy of Human Rights on July 3 to July 12th, 2017, at the Monastery of San Nicolò, Venice – Lido, Italy. Theme is “Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights as an Answer to Rising Inequalities.” Deadline to register is April 19, 2017. Details Here.

 

Work On! Siracusa International Institute for Criminal Justice and Human Rights

The Siracusa International Institute (SII) will host a specialisation course for junior prosecutors on internaitonal criminal justice and international cooperation in criminal matters on July 3-14, 2017, at SII in Siracusa, Italy. Deadline for applications is March 31, 2017. Details here

Additionally, the SII will hold a specialization course in international criminal law for young penalists (“The International Criminal Court at fifteen”) on May, 21-31, 2017  at SII. Deadline for applications is March 20, 2017. Details here.

Not-marchers on the march

nobloodforoilSo, I don’t march.

I stayed home when millions protested the invasion of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. Stayed home for “No Blood for Oil” too (though I did have the T-shirt, at left). Avoided the streets of my Paris sabbatical home on May Day 2002, when half a million marched to the chants of “Là-Bas Le Pen.”

Pretty much avoided all public demonstrations since childhood, never having really seen the point of taking to the streets instead of concrete action – that is, instead of litigating/teaching/reasoning/writing/policymaking toward lasting solutions.

So why march today?

► Because the promise of the election of Barack Obama – hands down, the best President of my lifetime – so soon was dashed by never-believed yet oft-repeated undercuttings of his citizenship. The spurious claims and the events that ensued sunk the hope that had lifted many of us in 2007 and 2008. Fell particularly hard on those of us who are immigrants, or who count immigrants among our loved ones.

aliceroom3Because in the last years we’ve been forced to swallow bile: cruel falsehoods about the 1st woman to be nominated by a major U.S. political party; harsh slaps against everyone who has endured sexual assault; soulless insults about every disadvantaged group imaginable.

► Because Looking-Glass intrigue belongs to the fantasy world of Lewis Carroll, not to the real world in which we all must live.

Because aspirations to human dignity, equality, liberty, and justice, without borders, will not withstand anti-“globalist” attack unless those of us who hold these values dear come to their defense.

Because if we fail to object, we fail our children.

To quote other ‘Grrls:

“It seems like a day when numbers matter.”

“I couldn’t not go.”

And so even we not-marchers march, in D.C., in Philadelphia, and, at last count, in nearly 700 other places around the world.

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Georgia Law’s International Law Colloquium returns for 2017

intl_law_colloquiumThe International Law Colloquium, a time-honored tradition here at the University of Georgia School of Law, returns this spring with another great lineup of global legal experts.

Led by my international law colleague and our newest holder of an international law professorship, Harlan G. Cohen (prior posts), this 3-credit course consists of presentations of substantial works-in-progress on a variety of international law topics by prominent scholars from other law schools. Since the series began in 2006, students have read and written reaction papers on the manuscripts of these scholars – including many IntLawGrrls – and then discussed the papers with the authors in class. Other Georgia Law and university faculty often have joined in these dialogues. I look forward to doing so this semester.

We at the Dean Rusk International Law Center are pleased to support this colloquium, thanks to the work of IntLawGrrl Kathleen A. Doty and Britney Hardweare, respectively, our Center’s Director of and Administrative Assistant for Global Practice Preparation.

Presenting at the Spring 2017 Colloquium are:

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◄ January 20: Duncan B. Hollis, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and James E. Beasley Professor of Law at Philadelphia’s Temple University Beasley School of Law, Constructing Norms for Global Cybersecurity.

kingsbury► January 27: Benedict Kingsbury, Murry & Ida Becker Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for International Law and Justice at New York University School of Law, Contested Megaregulation: Global Economic Ordering After TPP.

todres◄ February 3: Jonathan Todres, Professor of Law, Georgia State University College of Law, Human Rights Education: Traversing Legal and Geographical Boundaries.

jain► February 10: Neha Jain, Associate Professor of Law and McKnight Land-Grant Professor, University of Minnesota Law School, and an IntLawGrrls contributor, Radical Dissents at International Criminal Courts.

puig◄ February 24: Sergio Puig, Associate Professor of Law and Director of the International Economic Law and Policy Program at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, Blinding International Justice.

donde► March 15: Professor Javier Dondé Matute (LLM 1998) of the National Institute of Criminal Sciences, Mexico City, Mexico, a Spring 2017 Georgia Law Visiting Scholar, Criminal Responsibility as a Founding Principle of International Criminal Law.

durkee◄ March 24: Melissa J. Durkee, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Washington School of Law, The Global Norms Market.

achiume► March 31: Professor E. Tendayi Achiume, Assistant Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law, International Law and Xenophobic Anxiety.

(Cross-posted from Exchange of Notes)