International Law and International Human Rights Law Programming at the 2023 AALS

For those attending the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting in San Diego, California, here is a list of all International Law and International Human Rights Law-related programming.

  1. Conflict in Ukraine: Can Prosecuting Atrocity Crimes Make a Difference? (organizer/moderator Leila Sadat)

Cosponsors: Section on Comparative Law, Section on International Human Rights, Section on Global Engagement

Friday, January 6, 2023, 10:00 – 11:40 AM 

This program will focus on the atrocities committed during the conflict in Ukraine, from 2013 to the present time, as well as state responses to those actions. We will explore the actions of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and other justice mechanisms, including national systems, and the steps needed to investigate and prosecute atrocity crimes, as well as the political and diplomatic challenges to those prosecutions. We will also explore the reluctance of the United States to embrace the ICC as a global institution and the implications of that hesitancy for the legal academy and the Court. Finally, the panel will ask whether and how prosecuting atrocity crimes can make a difference either in Ukraine or elsewhere.

  • Second Program: Global War and Conflict in Ukraine and Beyond:  An Effective and Balanced Response? (Organizers/Moderators Craig Martin & Sahar Aziz)

Cosponsored by the Section on Comparative Law, the Section on Global Engagement, the Section on Litigation, and the Section on International Human Rights

Saturday, January 7, 2023, 8:30 – 10:10 AM 

The conflict in Ukraine, almost more than any other, has brought a host of international institutions and mechanisms to the fore and sparked litigation all over the globe. The United Nations Security Council, General Assembly, International Court of Justice, Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, Human Rights Council, European Court of Human Rights, World Trade Organization, and International Criminal Court are among the institutions that have acted or been engaged in addition to national courts.  Have national and international institutions been effective?  And why has the response in Ukraine seemingly been so different than the response in Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Israel/Palestine and a host of other “hot spots” around the world? This panel will take a look back at the events of 2022 and take stock of how well our international institutions have handled (or weathered) the events that unfolded.

  • Pedagogy Program: How Can Students and Faculty Make a Difference via Teaching and Clinical Work in Times of Crisis? (Organizers/Moderators Cindy Buys, Charlotte Ku & Milena Sterio)

Cosponsored by the Section on Global Engagement, Section on International Human Rights, and Section on Comparative Law. (Also cosponsored by teaching international law committee of ABILA.)

Friday, January 6, 2023, 3:00 – 4:40 PM

In light of conflicts around the globe, refugee flows, and human rights crises, this discussion will explore creative ways for faculty and students to make a positive difference and contribute to the development of international law through clinics, pro bono work, internships, externships, and other activities.

  • Discussion Group: Russia v. Ukraine: Implications for a New Global Order (organizer/moderator: Milena Sterio)

Thursday, January 5, 8:00 – 9:40 AM

This program will be a discussion group composed of experts who have studied the role of international law and international institutions in world affairs. The overall goal of this program will be to assess whether the ongoing conflict in Ukraine has the potential to disrupt the existing global order and our understanding of the role which international institutions play in global affairs. In addition, the panelists will focus on what role law schools will be able to play in terms of shaping such a possible new world order.

  • New Voices in International Human Rights (organizer/moderator: Milena Sterio)

Saturday, January 7, 1:00- 2:40 PM

This program will feature presentations by emerging scholars in the field of International Human Rights.

  • (organizer Tom McDonnell) 

Co-sponsored by the International Law Section.  

Friday, January 6, 1-2:40 PM

This Program covers the following: (a) To recognize that sanctions may advance the right to life; condemn Russia’s aggression, war crimes, and gross human rights violations against Ukraine; and may deter other states from violating international humanitarian law and human rights, and (b) To examine the intended and unintended consequences of general rather than smart sanctions; to acknowledge that few civilians bear responsibility for Russia’s aggressive war, war crimes, or gross human rights violations; and to analyze whether general sanctions violate the economic, social and cultural rights of the most vulnerable of the Russian civilian population.

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s