Call for Papers! IJSARD: International Journal of Socio-Legal Analysis and Rural Development Volume 2 Issue 2

Get your article published in an internationally indexed journal with a high  impact factor of  1.73.  International Journal of socio-legal analysis and Rural Development (IJSARD) is an online/print quarterly peer reviewed international journal on ‘Law’ and ‘Rural Development’. As the name suggests the journal will focus on the analysis of different laws for better understanding and research. The society needs the laws for proper functioning and thus the journal focuses to draw a special emphasis on various disciplines of social sciences, rural development and analysis of various aspects of law to improve the quality of research and explore the more realistic aspects of civilization’s sustainable developments. Establishing equilibrium between the society and law it will find the present and futuristic scope of growth and prosperity. Rural development is an essential part of a sustainable society.

Word limit for submissions:

Articles: 5,000-10,000 words.

Short Articles: 2,500-5,000 words.

Case study : 2,500-6,000 words

Theme

The articles must be related to Law and social sciences or rural development. They may relate Law or social sciences and rural development with other disciplines like Health, Agriculture, Law, Technology, Sustainable development, Environment and Climate change etc. The authors may take in account national and international perspectives.

 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Each submission must be accompanied with:

An abstract of not more than 200-250 words.

Main article.

List of References.

Short description about the author.

Formatting and Other Essentials:

Main text: Times New Roman, Font Size 12, 1.5 spaced.

Footnotes: Times New Roman, Font Size 10, single spaced.

Citation Method:  Any uniform citation.

The articles must be original and must not have been published earlier.

The articles must be sent to ijsard.editor@gmail.com by 30th August, 2016.

The submission must accompanied by a declaration that the contribution submitted is a piece of original research work of author and has not been published or submitted for publication elsewhere.

All submissions will be subject to a plagiarism check.

Professionals, Academicians, Scholars and Students of all disciplines are eligible to contribute.

Co-authorship will be allowed to a maximum of two authors and two separate certificates shall be issued for the publication of article in the journal.

The deadline for submissions is 30th August, 2016.

 

The authors of selected papers will be directed to pay INR 1000/- for, Co-authors INR 1800/- only after the selection of their paper for the,

The hard copy of certificate of publication.

Indexing of the Articles in the International Indexing Forums.

The journal in form of a CD.

All the selected articles will be on the website and only some selected papers will be published in the hard copy of the journal.

The copy of the journal will be sent to them along with a certificate of publication and CD.

 

Website: www.ijsard.org

Email id: ijsard.editor@gmail.com

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ijsard

 

For any query, contact:

Deepak Dugar

Mob: – +91-9413966749

 

Dheeraj Kumar Tiwari, 

Mob:- +91-7579006367  E-Mail:- advodheeraj@gmail.com

 

 link for the full notification 

http://ijsard.org/index.php/2016/08/01/ijsard-call-for-papers-international-journal-of-socio-legal-analysis-and-rural-development-volume-2-issue-2/

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Go On! Registration ends 12 Sept. for Institute for Global Law and Policy 2015 Workshop in Doha, Qatar

The Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP) at Harvard Law School invites you to apply to participate in its 2015 Workshop in Doha, Qatar, from January 2-11, 2015:

At the 2015 Workshop (January 2-11) we will continue to seek ways to deepen the network of collaboration among our Workshop alumni as well as continue to strengthen and renew our core program with new themes and new participants. Our aim is to build on the momentum of our first five Workshops as we strive to develop the premier site for networked innovation in the fields of global governance and economic policy among young scholars and policymakers from across the world. The full program for the 2015 IGLP Workshop, including Workshop Streams, will be announced soon.

IGLP: The Workshop is an intensive residential program designed for doctoral and post-doctoral scholars and junior faculty. This initiative aims to promote innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy, and social justice in the aftermath of the economic crisis. Our aim is to strengthen the next generation of scholars by placing them in collaboration with their global peers as they develop innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy, social justice and governance.

The IGLP is pleased to announce that we are currently accepting Participant applications for the 2015 IGLP Workshop, which will be held in Doha, during the first week of January 2015. We particularly encourage those who have not previously participated in the IGLP Workshop to apply as Participants.

The application deadline for the 2015 IGLP Participant application is September 12, 2014Click HERE to apply. 

To learn more, visit: http://www.harvardiglp.org/iglp-the-workshop/

Colombia: After the War- What Future for Women?

As the peace process with FARC inches along in Colombia, a question remains unasked: after the war, what will the future look like for women?

This question was the focal point for a series of events at Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá May 2 and 3, bringing together women grassroots leaders, Colombian cause lawyers, government officials and international scholars to imagine a Colombia after the war. From the viewpoint of transitional Justice (Ruth Rubio); social suffering (Lucie White) and suffering after war (Veena Das), and the Colombian conflict (Angélika Rettberg, Camila De Gamboa, Donny Meertens and María E. Wills).

Panelists were invited to imagine a future for women after the war, based on the premise that as academics committed to social justice, we have a high stake in ensuring women’s transformative and redistributive concerns are part of the post-conflict. And, more poignantly, that should the process fail to achieve peace for women, this be a failure of the will, not of the imagination.

Generally the experts were cautious. In the case of Colombia, even imagining an end to war is difficult. While a peace agreement between the government and the FARC guerrilla may be signed this year, such agreement will not mean an end to violence. The current war is only part of a long-lasting conflict that has torn apart several generations, and that today increasingly finds its expressions in illegal natural resource extraction practices, shady business deals, and the ubiquitous, armed presence of organized crime.

While the country is developing fast,  inequality levels remain among the highest in the world, and  murders and death threats  against social movement leaders, trade unionists, human rights defenders and other visible community leaders and intellectuals remain part and parcel of Colombian social and political life.

At the same time, Colombia is a constitutional democracy with a strong administrative state, and far-reaching legal protection mechanisms for vulnerable groups, mechanisms that are used actively by a plethora of grassroots organizations in their struggle for social change. It is also the scene of rapidly changing institutional mechanisms for both responding to the ongoing humanitarian crisis, and, if the government has its way, to ensure a transition to peace.

In 2011 the government and Congress adopted land-breaking legislation (Law 1448 of 2011) to repair victims of armed conflict, which, like the many Constitutional Court decisions which address the matter, take women’s concerns seriously. This legal framework replaced that of internal displacement as the official response to the humanitarian crisis, transforming the category of internally displaced people to a broad category of “victims” of different crimes by different perpetrators  under the 2011 victims law, all entitled to reparations in the truth/justice/reparations mantra of transitional justice.

Yet, the new system has met significant difficulties in implementation. These arise in part from the usual problems with setting up a new national agency with insufficient resources to deal with an enormous vulnerable population. They also arise from the persistent reprisals by illegal armed actors against potential beneficiaries and, increasingly, against officials of the victim’s relief programs.

In this context, hope is hard to muster, even in the protected hallways of the elite Universidad de los Andes. And while there is a substantive amount of civil society activism on feminist issues, most of this activism focus on making sexual violence, and its victims, visible. Few activists, if any, are asking difficult questions about the transformations (including redistribution of resources) that a peace process, with its ensuing transition, might bring for women, especially for the rural women who have born the enormous weight of war. Hence, we must keep asking the question: After the war; what future for these women?

Julieta Lemaitre and Kristin Bergtora Sandvik