Kosovo Specialist Chambers: Launch of New Website

The Kosovo Specialist Chambers would like to announce the launch of its new website. At the inaugural press conference of the Kosovo Specialist Chambers held in The Hague, the Netherlands, (15th September), the Registrar, Dr Fidelma Donlon, emphasised the website as the legitimate institutional source of facts about the Chambers. Dr Donlon encouraged all those interested in the work of the Kosovo Specialist Chambers to look to the website and to engage directly with the Public Information and Communication Unit of the Kosovo Specialist Chambers. The website is presented in the three languages of the Specialist Chambers, and will provide up-to-date information on the Chambers, as well as on any proceedings that may be held.

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Announcements

New Grants Available

Two EU grants advertised for work relating to children’s rights, specifically focusing on children’s rights in the context of migration/asylum and children-centred approaches to child victims of violence. Please forward on to European colleagues you think might be interested. For a link to the grants, click here.

Jobs

Manager, Ferencz International Justice Initiative

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is looking for a dedicated and passionate individual to join the Museum’s team and help support our mission. The Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide works to ensure that the United States government, governments around the world, and multilateral organizations institutionalize structures, tools, and policies to effectively prevent and respond to genocide and mass atrocities.

The Simon-Skjodt Center is seeking a Manager, Ferencz International Justice Initiative whom will work under the supervision of the Simon-Skjodt Center’s Deputy Director and work with the Ferencz International Justice Initiative Senior Consultant on a day-to-day basis in developing and implementing the Initiative’s objectives. The purpose of this position is to provide leadership in planning and implementing the work of the newly established Benjamin Ferencz International Justice Initiative. This initiative was established by a gift from Benjamin Ferencz, the last surviving prosecutor from the Nuremberg Tribunal, to strengthen the rule of law and the legal architecture for atrocity prevention and response; promote justice and accountability for atrocities committed in countries of concern; and establish a significant new locus for policy and research on the use of international justice mechanisms to deter, prevent, and respond to mass atrocities.

This is a full-time donated position (non-Federal) paid with the Museum’s donated funds. Salary is commensurate with experience.

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Write on! Call for Papers: NALSAR International Law Journal

The NALSAR International Law Journal, and the NALSAR International Law Society (affiliated to the ILSA) are located at the NALSAR University of Law, Hyderabad, India. The NALSAR International Law Journal was launched in recognition of an acute lack of International Law scholarship in India. 

The first edition of the Journal received a great response, and the International Law Society at NALSAR has since come a long way. That edition can be accessed here – https://nilj.nalsar.ac.in/Archive.php. This year, we seek to bring out an annual edition of the Journal, and encourage discussion on Public International Law in Indian academic circles. We are keen on publishing articles drawing attention to gender issues within international law.

 

More Information About the Call for Papers Can be Found Here: call-for-papers-nalsar-international-law-journal

Read On! ‘Developing the Right to Social Security – A Gender Perspective’

I am really pleased to be writing for IntLawGrrls for the first time and to introduce my new book Developing the Right to Social Security – A Gender Perspective which is part of the Routledge Research in Human Rights Series. The right to social security has become increasingly relevant in the context of austerity cuts to welfare in many parts of the developed world following the global financial crisis. At the same time, there has been a burgeoning of social protection programs in developing nations as a response to poverty. Many countries in the world now recognise the right to social security within their national constitutions and the international law in this area has recently been given greater definition. These developments present an opportunity to consider the gender dimensions of this right, particularly as women face disproportional poverty all over the world.
My book develops a set of principles for a substantively equal, gendered right to social security by rethinking the relationship between the right to social security and traditional conceptions of work. I argue for a new understanding of this crucial right that takes account of women’s unpaid labour, informal work, and care, within the context of global economic changes. The book applies this gender perspective to an examination of the international law on the right to social security and includes three country studies – India, South Africa and Australia. Hopefully the book will be of interest to people working on international law, comparative constitutional law, social policy, feminism and women’s rights.

Call for Papers: The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law/Revue Femmes et droit

Call for Submissions

 The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law/ Revue Femmes et droit is Canada’s oldest and only feminist legal periodical. Since it began in 1985, the journal has provided a forum in which feminist writers from diverse backgrounds, speaking from a wide range of experience, can exchange ideas and information about legal issues that affect women. We are looking to build on this tradition and remain committed to reflecting a diversity of political, social, cultural, and economic thinking, unified by a shared interest in law reform.

We invite submissions from people who are engaged in feminist analysis of socio-legal issues that reflect a range of approaches, including multidisciplinary, action-focused, theoretical, and historical, and that reflect linguistic and regional differences in Canada. We particularly encourage submissions authored by women from different backgrounds, disciplines and jurisdictions who are doing new feminist work.

The CJWL/RFD is seeking papers for publication in the following sections of the CJWL/RFD: articles, review essays, commentaries, case comments, research notes, book reviews, and notes on Canadian and International events of interest to our readers. Comments on previously published materials are also welcome.

Full submissions information is available here

Appel à contributions

La Revue Femmes et droit/The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law est le plus ancien périodique consacré à des analyses féministes en droit au Canada. Depuis son lancement en 1985, la Revue offre aux auteures féministes de tous horizons un forum où échanger des idées et de l’information sur des questions juridiques qui touchent les femmes. Nous souhaitons renforcer cette tradition, en continuant de nourrir des réflexions politiques, sociales, culturelles et économiques diversifiées qui partagent un même intérêt pour la réforme du droit.

Nous accueillons les contributions de personnes engagées dans l’analyse féministe d’enjeux sociojuridiques. Les articles reflèteront à la fois des approches variées – multidisciplinaires, centrées sur l’action et historiques, notamment –, et les différences linguistiques et régionales du Canada. Nous recherchons, en particulier, des travaux de féministes issues de différentes formations, disciplines et juridictions qui renouvèlent les approches et analyses féministes.

La RFD/CJWL sollicite des textes relevant des catégories suivantes : articles, études de fond, commentaires de jurisprudence, études de cas, notes de recherche, recensions de livres, et observations sur les évènements nationaux et internationaux susceptibles d’intéresser notre lectorat. Les réactions à des textes publiés précédemment sont également bienvenues.

Vous trouverez tous les renseignements concernant les propositions d’articles ici

If you have comments or questions, please contact:

Natasha Bakht

English Language Co-Editor

Canadian Journal of Women and the Law

cjwl-rfd@uottawa.ca

Annie Rochette

French Language Co-Editor – Corédactrice francophone

Revue Femmes et droit

Accountability Counsel Internships

One of the premier human rights law firms in the country – Accountability Counsel – is looking for students and recent graduates interested in international law, human rights, accountability, dispute resolution, complex negotiations, environmental justice, corporate accountability, women’s rights, and/or international development.

Accountability Council:

assists communities around the world to defend their environmental and human rights. …

and seeks to

hold corporate and institutional violators accountable through our dual approaches: direct support to communities and policy advocacy.

The organization in particular works on behalf of people and communities harmed by internationally-financed projects through community driven and policy level strategies to access justice.

The following opportunities are now open for our Fall 2016 unpaid Fellow and Intern Programs:

  • Law Fellow – San Francisco – 2L and 3L law students or recent law school graduates (within one year of graduation).
  • South Asia Law Fellow – Washington, D.C – 2L and 3L law students or recent law school graduates (within one year of graduation).
  • Policy Fellow – Washington, D.C. – law students, graduate students currently studying policy and/or another related field, or recent graduates (within one year of graduation).
  • Data Analyst Fellow – San Francisco – graduate students and recent graduates (within one year of graduation) in a related field of data or statistics.
  • Communications & Operations Intern – San Francisco – undergraduate students or recent graduates (within one year of graduation).
  • Data Intern – San Francisco – undergraduate students or recent graduates (within one year of graduation).

Any interested students/recent graduates should consult the website for more information.  To apply, students must complete an online application form.

CICIG’s investigations show web of corruption in Guatemalan state. Now, what’s next?

Two weeks ago, CICIG (International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala) revealed that the Partido Popular (PP), the former governing party of now disgraced and imprisoned former president Otto Pérez Molina and his—also incarcerated—vice president Roxana Baldetti, was engaged in a web of corruption far more extensive than initially thought. Shortly after reaching power, the party, under the direction of President Pérez Molina, had established an organized criminal structure that had seized the state, and developed an elaborate scheme of collusion between the local private sector and the state to enrich public servants and grant companies easy access to government contracts.

The revelations come just as the so-called Northern Triangle countries (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras) are about to receive a large infusion of international assistance through the $750 million U.S. funded Alliance for Prosperity that, rather than being limited to security sector support, seeks to stimulate economic development and strengthen democratic institutions. But given what CICIG has now revealed, are Guatemala and the other recipients ready to adopt the structural changes necessary to effectively channel and apply these funds, to address corruption at its roots?

CICIG was established in 2007 under the auspices of the United Nations to investigate organized criminal networks with links to the state. It is bound by Guatemalan law and must work closely with the country’s Public Ministry. CICIG’s operations have had their ups and downs, as has been documented in a recent report by the Open Society Justice Initiative. However, under the current leadership of Colombian prosecutor Iván Velásquez, it has made important strides in uncovering corruption and eroding impunity of even some of the most powerful.

CICIG’s most important case to date was brought to light in April 2015, when the investigatory body revealed a corruption scheme within the country’s customs authority. That case, named “La Línea,” implicated then-President Otto Pérez Molina and Vice-President Roxana Baldetti, as well as other high-level officials. The massive public outcry that followed led to the resignation of both the President and the Vice-President. Since then, CICIG and the Public Ministry have continued their investigations, and in the following months uncovered more such corruption rings involving high-level officials and prominent businesspeople.

Additional information retrieved through searches and phone taps exposed an even more extensive scheme than originally thought. In June 2016, CICIG concluded that the PP, the former government party, rather than having engaged in occasional (but serious) acts of corruption, was essentially an organized criminal enterprise whose primary purpose was to reach power to gain access to public resources for private gain. Continue reading