Read On! ‘Human Security and Human Rights under International Law: The Protections Offered to Persons Confronting Structural Vulnerability’

I am thrilled to post for the first time in IntLawGrrls and to share the publication of my book Human Security and Human Rights under International Law: The Protections Offered to Persons Confronting Structural Vulnerability (Hart Publishing, 2016).

This book considers the potential of human security as a protective tool within the international law of human rights. Indeed, it seems surprising given the centrality of human security to the human experience, that its connection with human rights had not yet been explored in a truly systematic way. The book attempts to address that gap in the literature and sustains that the human rights of persons, particularly those facing structural vulnerability, can be addressed more adequately if studied through the complementary lens of human security and not under human rights law alone. It takes both a legal and interdisciplinary approach, recognizing that human security and its relationship with human rights cuts across disciplinary boundaries.

Human security with its axis of freedom from fear, from want and from indignity, can more integrally encompass the inter-connected risks faced by individuals and groups in vulnerable conditions. At the same time, human rights law provides the normative legal grounding usually lacking in human security. International human rights norms, individualistic in nature and firstly enacted more than sixty years ago, present limits which translate into lack of protection for people globally. As a result, the collective and contextual conditions undergone by persons can be better met through the broader and more recent notion of human security, which emphasizes ‘critical (severe) and pervasive (widespread) threats’, and accentuates socioeconomic vulnerabilities as authentic security concerns. Indeed, as signaled by Sadako Ogata, human security is ‘the emerging paradigm for understanding global vulnerabilities’.

The analysis follows a two-part approach. Firstly, it evaluates convergences between human security and all human rights – civil, political, economic, social and cultural –and constructs a general framework for thought and action, the ‘human security – human rights synergy’. Secondly, it goes on to explore the practical application of this framework in the law and case-law of UN, European, Inter-American and African human rights bodies in the thematic cores of 1) violence against women and girls (VAW); 2) undocumented migrants and other non-citizens such as asylum-seekers and refugees; converging in 3) a particular examination of the conditions of female undocumented migrants. In the last chapter, the book systematizes this evidence to reveal and propose added values of human security to human rights law; and inversely, it indicates how human rights standards/indicators can deliver a needed more precise, normatively grounded and operational conception of human security.

These ‘interpretative synergies’ offer promise for shifting the boundaries of international human rights law: in constructing integrative approaches to fill legal gaps, better prevention and addressing protectively collective threats, and –in the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights- creating an ‘enabling environment’ to fulfil all human rights, especially for those not only confronting isolated moments of risk or individual human rights violations, but rather conditions of structural vulnerability affecting their everyday lives. Continue reading

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Go On! AEL summer courses on Human Rights Law and Law of the EU (deadline April 4)

The Academy of European Law (AEL) holds two summer courses each year, on Human Rights Law and the Law of the European Union.  The 2016 Human Rights Law Course will be held from 20 June to 1 July. It comprises a General Course on ‘The Sources of International Human Rights Law’ by Professor Jean d’Aspremont (University of Manchester and University of Amsterdam) and a series of specialized courses on the topic of ‘The Sources of Human Rights’ by leading scholars from universities all over the world.

The 2016 Law of the European Union Course will be held from 4 July to 15 July. It comprises a General Course on ‘The Global Reach of EU Law’ by Professor Joanne Scott (University College London) and a series of specialized courses on the same topic by leading scholars and practitioners in the Law of the European Union.

The two-week courses are held at the European University Institute, in the hills above Florence, and participants leave with positive memories of the extremely high intellectual standard of the courses, the EUI facilities including the library, the beautiful venue, and the interaction with other participants from all over the world. Some participants come to study at the EUI in later years, and it is not unusual to see participants returning for a second or third summer course.

The deadline for applications  is Monday 4 April 2016. For further information, visit the Academy’s website at http://www.eui.eu/DepartmentsAndCentres/AcademyEuropeanLaw/SummerSchool/Index.aspx

Go On! PhD seminar: Methods of Human Rights Law Research, University of Iceland (deadline 1 April)

 

The University of Iceland Human Rights Institute and iCourts, the Danish National Research Foundation´s Centre of Excellence for International Courts at Copenhagen University, will host a seminar on “Methods of Human Rights Law Research” from 26-27 May 2015 at the University of Iceland Human Rights Institute.

Venue: University Iceland Faculty of Law, in the Lögberg building, Sæmundargata 8, room 402.

  • The deadline for applications is on Wednesday 1 April 2015.  Please apply by e-mail to Sigrún Á Heygum Ólafsdóttir, project manager (sah@hi.is).  She will also answer any practical questions regarding the course.
  • All other questions regarding the seminar can be directed to Oddný Mjöll Arnardóttir, course organiser (oddnyma@hi.is).
  • Course Programme (pdf)
  • Course Syllabus (pdf)

For more information, visit http://jura.ku.dk/icourts/news/methods-human-rights-law-research.

Write On! UVA Law Human Rights Student Scholars Writing Competition Deadline June 27

HRSSWC 2014 Poster-2

The University of Virginia School of Law Human Rights Program and the Virginia Journal of International Law are sponsoring the Sixth Annual Virginia Law Human Rights Student Scholars Writing Competition (HRSSWC). This global competition is designed to encourage student scholarly inquiry into human rights topics and afford emerging student scholars an opportunity to develop their research and contributions by interacting with Virginia’s preeminent international law faculty. The HRSSWC welcomes all student papers relating to human rights law from current J.D., LL.M., and S.J.D. students from the United States and abroad. May 2014 graduates may also submit papers written as part of their law school curriculum. Entrants are encouraged to view this topic broadly, submitting any work that furthers understanding of a substantive area of human rights law. The student author of the top paper will receive a cash prize of $500 and expedited consideration for publication in the Virginia Journal of International Law. Additionally, the winning author will be invited to present his or her paper at a special Human Rights Student Scholars Workshop involving Virginia’s international law faculty, VJIL editors, and Virginia law students. Papers will be judged on quality of analysis and writing. The judging committee will include members of Virginia’s law faculty and VJIL editors.

The deadline for entry is June 27, 2014. Please submit entries to: hrsswc@vjil.org.