Putting the “Woman Question” front and centre: Professor Ruth Rubio Marín

SOU-Ruth

On 5-7 May 2016, the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, hosted the sixth edition of the State of the Union, a space for high-level reflection on Europe. This year, these reflections revolved around the topic of Women in Europe and the World. There were many amazing and strong women who spoke at this conference, such as Valerie Amos and Patricia Sellers, and the various panels featured fascinating discussions on topics such as women in conflict, women and transition in the Middle East, migration, employment and social affairs, or sexual and reproductive politics. One particular highlight of the conference was the State of the Union address on day 2, given by Professor Ruth Rubio Marín (pictured above), who holds the chair of Constitutional and Public Comparative Law at the European University Institute. Her powerful speech was rewarded with what seemed like a never-ending standing ovation. It was well deserved. I highly recommend listening to the address in full, but here are some highlights.

In her speech, Professor Ruth Rubio Marín highlighted the injustices women and girls in Europe and the World face on a daily basis in a very straight forward manner. For those of us working on issues of gender equality and women’s emancipation and rights, the statistics Professor Rubio Marin provided were all too familiar. One in three women will suffer some form of physical or sexual violence at least once during their lifetime, and for one in five women, this violence occurs at the hands of a current or former partner. Yet, only 14 per cent of women report their most serious incident of intimate partner violence to the police. Women receive only 84 cents to every euro men earn, and the pension gap between women and men is 38 per cent. Working men devote only 9 hours a week to unpaid care and household duties, compared to 26 hours a week for working women. The gap in care responsibilities when high-wage women enter the labour market, is often filled by migrant women, thus perpetuating global (gender) inequalities. Women still account for only 20 per cent of company board members of the largest publicly listed companies, and on average only 28 percent of parliamentarians around the world are women. Androcentric values remain systematically privileged over those traditionally seen as ‘feminine’. As Professor Rubio Marín so rightfully stated: “Oppression does not only happen in cases of a cruel tyrant with bad intentions. Indeed, a well-intentioned liberal society can place system-wide constraints on groups and limit their freedom, relying not only on overt rules but also on unquestioned norms, habits and symbols.”

But what struck me most about her address was her courage and honesty. The personal became the general, the general the personal. When speaking about the by now well-known statistics about the number of women who have suffered some form of physical or sexual violence (1 out of 3), she bravely said: “Ladies and gentlemen, I have never said so publicly, but the time has come to unite and end any form of silence. I was one in the ones out of three.” And when addressing the gender pay gap, she directly addressed the president of the European University Institute, Professor Joseph H.H. Weiler, saying: “The gender pay gap is perpetuated by the generalised practice of lack of transparency around payment by almost every employer, including our beloved European University Institute. Dearest president, perhaps the time has come to change that?”

By drawing on these experiences, Professor Rubio Marín made the numbers we so often hear personal, perhaps making it a little easier for those more unfamiliar with the statistics to grasp their meaning. I could not help but notice that the majority of speakers on the second day of the conference, held at Palazzo Vecchio, were men (14 men versus 13 women spoke on day 2). I hope we can count on all of them in the struggle for gender equality, both in Europe and in the World. Women remain an oppressed group, and it is up to all of us together to change that. To paraphrase Professor Rubio Marín: Now, more than ever, we must put the “Woman Question” front and centre, both in Europe and in the World.

  • Listen to Professor Ruth Rubio Marín’s speech in full
  • Get a written copy of the speech
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On the Job! Chair in Constitutional and/or Public Law with focus on gender, sexuality, and race studies, EUI (deadline 23 March)

The European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy,  is looking for candidates with a distinguished record of scholarly publications and experience in postgraduate teaching and doctoral supervision, to fill a Chair in Constitutional and/or Public Law. The Department of Law would particularly welcome candidates interested in theoretical dimensions of the field (which may include dimensions of gender, sexuality and race), as well as comparative, transnational and international dimensions. The chair is open to candidates at all levels of seniority.

The successful candidate is expected to commence on 1 September 2016. The contract is for five years, renewable for a further three years. The Institute is an equal opportunity employer, and takes into account the importance of balance in gender, geographical and minority representation.

Interested applicants should consult http://www.eui.eu/vacancies for further details.

Deadline for receipt of applications: 23 March 2015

CONTACTS

Academic Service
Veerle Deckmyn, Director
Tel.: +39 055.4685.359
E-mail: applypro@eui.eu Internet: http://www.eui.eu

European University Institute Via dei Roccettini 9
I-50014 San Domenico di Fiesole ITALY

Go On! Academy of European Law offers summer courses in Human Rights, EU Law; deadline April 10

The Academy of European Law at the European University Institute (EUI) has announced this year’s summer courses in Human Rights Law and the Law of the European Union:

The Academy’s Summer Courses are renowned for their innovative and cutting-edge topics, combined with the highest standards of academic content presented by leading scholars and thinkers. Each year the courses attract highly qualified participants from all around the world and the mix of participants from different backgrounds makes the experience of attending the summer courses a very rewarding one.

·         The 2014 Human Rights Law course (16 June – 27 June) comprises a General Course on ‘21st Century Human Rights’ by Harold Hongju Koh (Sterling Professor of International Law, Yale Law School) and a series of specialized courses on the topic of ‘Freedom of Religion, Secularism and Human Rights’. We are also pleased to have two distinguished lectures by Bruno Simma (Judge at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal; former Judge at the International Court of Justice) and Joseph H.H. Weiler (President of the European University Institute).

·         The 2014 Law of the European Union course  (30 June – 11 July) comprises a General Course on ‘The Internal Market as a Legal Concept’ by Stephen Weatherill (Jacques Delors Professor of European Law, Oxford University) and a series of specialized courses on the topic of ‘EU Legal Acts: Challenges and Transformations’. The Summer School will also include a distinguished lecture by Marta Cartabia, an EUI alumna now Judge at the Italian Constitutional Court and Professor of Constitutional Law, Bicocca University in Milan.

The two-week courses are held at the EUI, in the hills above Florence, and participants leave with positive memories of the extremely high intellectual standard of the courses, the EUI facilities including the library, the beautiful venue, and the interaction with other participants from all over the world. Some participants come to study at the EUI in later years, and it is not unusual to see participants returning for a second or third summer course.

The deadline for applications  is Thursday 10 April 2014.

For further information, visit the Academy’s website at www.eui.eu/AEL.

Apply now