The Crime of Aggression: Still a live issue

Liechtenstein hosted a panel this morning at the Assembly of States Parties (ASP) titled “The ICC’s Jurisdiction Over the Crime of Aggression”. This panel sought to discuss the significance and broader context of the crime of aggression. Panelists included IntLawGrrl Jennifer Trahan, Professor at the Center for Global Affairs at New York University, David Donat Cattin, Secretary-General of Parliamentarians for Global Action, and Donald Ferencz, the Convenor of the Global Institute on the Prevention of Aggression. This panel complemented many of the comments that States made at the General Debate session held yesterday that continued after this panel on the activation of the crime of aggression.

Many States Parties made supportive statements on the activation of the crime of aggression during the General Debate on Day 1 that continued after Liechtenstein’s panel today on Day 2. Austria spoke on behalf of the European Union (EU) in support of the activation of the crime of aggression, and all EU member states commented that they supported Austria’s statement. Most notably, however, France was quite critical of the Kampala Amendments as promoting division amongst States Parties when the focus should be universality. China as well was critical of the Amendments, stating that the International Criminal Court (ICC) should not undermine the Security Council, as it is this body that is responsible for upholding international peace and security. Given that China is a permanent member of the Security Council and is not a party to the ICC, this comment is not surprising. Many states commented that they are in the process of ratifying the Amendments, which was a welcome announcement, including Paraguay and Greece.

During the panel, Jennifer Trahan began the discussion with an analysis of the text of Article 8bis of the Rome Statute which enumerates the crime of aggression. As discussed in my previous post, Trahan stated that the language in Article 8bis derives from the London Statute of the Nuremberg Tribunal and that the crime of aggression is not meant to encompass all violations of Article 2(4) of the UN Charter, but manifest violations. Manifest violations, she clarified, are those that are super clear and not in a grey zone. She also discussed the novel jurisdictional regime that exists within the crime of aggression with regard to state and proprio motu referrals compared to the other three international crimes:  non-States Parties to the Rome Statute are completely excluded from the Court’s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression; not all States Parties are automatically covered by 15bis jurisdiction; and there is an opt-out method for States to opt out of the Court’s jurisdiction over the crime.

ASP

Photo credit: coalitionfortheicc.org

David Donat Cattin held a very positive view on the activation of the crime of aggression and discussed some of the progress being made for further ratifications. He referenced the Austrian delegate’s support for the activation of the crime of aggression on behalf of the EU and hoped that this statement would have an impact on other EU member states to encourage their ratification. He also mentioned that the Dominican Republic will be voting on whether to ratify the amendment in the next year. He added that the Central African Republic is likely to join because they are subjected to foreign interference on all sides. He also mentioned that South Africa highlighted the historic significance of the Kampala Amendments at the General Debate, so this may indicate its ratification in the next year.

Donald Ferencz completed the panel with some very engaging comments that started with this statement: “the rule of law is for the little people”. He commented that a state like Liechtenstein, who has ratified the Amendments, is likely not about to commit the crime of aggression, but two permanent members of the Security Council who are also States Parties to the Rome Statute (referencing the UK and France) have not ratified the Amendments. This sends the message that this law/crime is not for bigger states like the UK and France, but is for the smaller states, who are unlikely to be the ones committing the crime in the first place. This was quite an interesting comment in light of France’s statement regarding the Kampala Amendments promoting division at the General Debate yesterday.

One quite interesting debate that evolved out of the panel concerned how to hold state officials liable for the crime of aggression when the state is not a party to the Rome Statute, with specific reference to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. This question was first brought up by Sabine Nolke, Canadian Ambassador to the Netherlands. A few intervenors were of the view that, in the case of Russia, war crimes committed in Ukraine (because Ukraine is a party to the Rome Statute) can be prosecuted and the Court could consider the fact that Russia committed an act of aggression as an aggravating factor in the prosecution of war crimes and in sentencing. Nolke and members of the panel, however, cautioned against this view because it suggests that war crimes committed in non-aggressive wars are less grave or less prosecutable. She and the panelists stressed that war crimes are war crimes no matter the context, and they should not be treated differently based on whether or not there is an aggressive war.

States’ comments during the General Debate and the discussion during this panel indicate that, although there seems to be a large degree of support for the activation of the crime, ratification is still a live issue and questions of jurisdiction are far from settled.

This blogpost and the author’s attendance to the 17thAssembly of States Parties to the International Criminal Court are supported by the Canadian Partnership for International Justice and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Partnership logo

SSHRC-CRSH_FIP

Advertisements

The Crime of Aggression: 1 Year Later

ICC

Photo credit: BBC: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-29548753

This year’s Assembly of States Parties (ASP) marks the first time the Court and States Parties will discuss the crime of aggression since its activation last year, and it will be interesting to hear what States Parties have to say about it. One issue that may be addressed includes the relationship between the Court and the Security Council given that the Security Council must first determine that an act of aggression has occurred before the Court can prosecute the crime of aggression (there is, however, an exception to this if 6 months have passed since the Security Council was made aware that an alleged act of aggression has occurred and has not made a determination). The implementation of the Kampala Amendments is another potential issue because there has been debate surrounding whether the amendments should be universally implemented for all States Parties to the Rome Statute or only for those that ratify the amendment. A third potential issue of discussion is how the Court will fund the addition of this crime to its jurisdiction given the already constrained budget.

The crime of aggression is the fourth crime enumerated under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Twenty years ago, States could not agree upon the definition of the crime of aggression when the text of the Rome Statute was negotiated, thereby excluding crimes of aggression from the Court’s jurisdiction.

The definition was finally agreed upon in 2010 through the Kampala Amendments, but negotiating States decided that the Court would still not have jurisdiction over the crime of aggression until one year after 30 member states had ratified the Amendments and it was promulgated by the Assembly of States Parties (ASP).

As Palestine was the 30th State to ratify the Amendments in June 2016, the ASP agreed to activate the Court’s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression during their meetings in December of 2017. The Court’s jurisdiction officially became active on July 17, 2018.

The key issue and reason for the delay in agreeing to the text of the crime was the lack of agreement on whether the Court could exercise jurisdiction for the crime of aggression over the nationals of States Parties to the Rome Statute who had not ratified the Amendments. The wide view on this issue is that the Court has jurisdiction when the crime occurs on the territory of a State which has ratified the Amendment. Still, there are those, including Canada, that believe that the Court would not have jurisdiction over state referrals or proprio motu investigations when the alleged crime is committed by nationals of non-ratifying States or on their territory.

The crime of aggression essentially allows for individual criminal responsibility for violations of Article 2(4) of the Charter of the United Nations. Article 2(4) prohibits “the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state”. However, not all violations of the prohibition on the use of force will constitute a crime of aggression: only the most serious and dangerous forms.

The Rome Statute is the first modern criminal tribunal to include the crime of aggression, but the International Military Tribunals (IMT) in Nuremberg and Tokyo included prosecutions and convictions for crimes against peace, which criminalized those involved in waging wars of aggression or wars in violation of international treaties. The language of the crime of aggression was borne out of and based on the Charter of the IMT.

The crime of aggression has not been prosecuted yet and there is no precedent for the Court to follow. It will be interesting to see how the Court interprets the crime once the first charges are made, and if it takes any guidance from the IMTs or develops its own interpretation.

Stay tuned for updates!

This blogpost and my attendance to the 17th Assembly of States Parties are supported by the Canadian Partnership for International Justice and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Partnership logo

SSHRC-CRSH_FIP

L’adoption par consensus de la résolution en vue de l’activation de la compétence de la Cour pénale internationale à l’égard du crime d’agression

20171214_223012.jpg

Plusieurs représentants des Etats Parties en consultation avec les Vice-Présidents lors de la session plénière visant à l’adoption de la résolution relative à l’agression.

L’activation de la compétence de la Cour pénale internationale (CPI) à l’égard du crime d’agression a fait l’objet de longues négociations tout au long de la 16ème Assemblée des États Parties (AÉP) qui a eu lieu au siège des Nations Unies, à New York, du 4 au 14 décembre 2017. Après de vifs débats et discussions, la résolution ICC-ASP/16/L.10* en vue de l’activation de la compétence de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression a été adoptée par consensus, tard dans la nuit du 15 décembre. Cette contribution vise à rendre compte de quelques positions des États qui ont été exposées tant dans le débat général que lors de l’adoption par consensus de la résolution.

Dans le cadre du débat général, les Pays-Bas ont réitéré leur engagement et leur soutien à la Cour en soulignant que la lutte contre l’impunité était la pierre angulaire du système institué par le Statut de Rome. En ce qui concerne le crime d’agression et l’activation de la compétence de la Cour, les Pays-Bas ont fait valoir que les amendements de Kampala constituent une victoire historique contre l’impunité et que cette AÉP a la chance de pouvoir, à nouveau, écrire l’histoire en consolidant le message porté par Nuremberg, soit celui du triomphe contre la barbarie et de l’égalité devant de la loi. Le Liechtenstein et la Slovénie ont exprimé des positions dans le même sens.

Les Philippines, tout en réaffirmant que la CPI est une Cour de dernier ressort, ont souligné la nécessité de renoncer à la guerre comme moyen de conduite de la politique en soutenant l’activation de la compétence de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression et de la guerre afin de se conformer aux obligations découlant de la Charte des Nations Unies, dont l’article 2, § 4, prohibe l’usage de la force dans la conduite des relations diplomatiques.

Le représentant du Costa Rica a rappelé qu’à un an du 20ème anniversaire du Statut de Rome, le fondement de la CPI a été le fondement de l’empire du droit, présentant la Cour comme une institution de valeur exceptionnelle et non comme une organisation internationale de plus. En effet, la figure de la Cour s’avère indispensable aujourd’hui et dans le futur pour sanctionner, en dernier ressort et dans le respect du principe de complémentarité, les crimes internationaux les plus graves. Ainsi, pour le Costa Rica, l’activation du crime d’agression, la garantie de l’indépendance judiciaire de la Cour et du respect du Statut de Rome doivent avoir un caractère dissuasif en vue de la protection des États qui n’ont pas les moyens de repousser une agression armée. C’est pour cela qu’une CPI renforcée répond au besoin de garantir la paix et la sécurité internationales, le Statut de Rome devant être l’instrument suprême pour éradiquer le crime d’agression conformément à la Charte des Nations Unies.

La Suisse a rappelé aux États les engagements pris au titre de la Charte des Nations Unies et a souligné le besoin de renforcer l’interdiction du recours à la force dans les relations interétatiques, en félicitant le Panama qui a été le 35ème État à ratifier les Amendements de Kampala. Si, en 1998, les États sont parvenus à un accord pour inclure dans la compétence de la Cour « le crime des crimes » et qu’en 2010, un accord a été trouvé en vue de la définition de l’agression, il apparaissait essentiel, en 2017, de déterminer l’étendue de la protection des victimes potentielles d’une agression. La représentante suisse a mis l’accent sur la dépendance des petits États du respect de l’ordre international, face à des États puissants qui ont les moyens d’assurer leur propre défense et de faire valoir leurs intérêts, en rappelant que cette décision historique de l’activation revenait à privilégier l’État du droit ou le règne du pouvoir.

Le Botswana, premier État africain à avoir ratifié les Amendements de Kampala, a apporté également son soutien à l’activation du crime d’agression en estimant que l’entrée en vigueur de la compétence de la Cour constituerait un énorme pas dans la progression de la justice pénale internationale grâce à la criminalisation de l’usage de la force illégal pouvant être sanctionné de manière pénale. Dès le débat général, l’État indépendant des Samoa a exprimé sa déception et son découragement de voir le peu de soutien de la part des États à l’égard du crime d’agression et leur volonté de négocier a minima l’activation de la compétence de la Cour à travers les négociations et les discussions.

Les divergences entre les États petits en faveur d’une pleine et entière activation de la compétence de la CPI à l’égard de l’agression, et les États puissants favorables à une activation limitée, se sont reflétées au moment des discussions visant à l’adoption de la résolution finale, bien que tous les États aient manifesté leur souhait en vue d’une adoption par consensus, redoutant le recours au vote.

Tout au long de l’AÉP, les réunions des groupes de travail ont été fermées au public et les débats de la journée de clôture se sont déroulés à huit-clos. Les deux propositions de résolution soumises par la représentante de l’Autriche, en charge de mener les négociations, ont toutes les deux été rejetées par les États. C’est finalement la Vice-Présidence qui a soumis la proposition de résolution finale en soulignant que ce texte n’était pas ouvert à une renégociation. Le texte a été simplement revu en raison d’une erreur substantielle dans un des paragraphes opérants. Cependant, avant son adoption par consensus, de nombreux États ont laissé transparaître leurs inquiétudes, fait valoir plusieurs points de vue et ont tenté de modifier la version finale du texte.

La position de l’État de Palestine exprimée dans le débat général résume assez bien le point de désaccord fondamental, à savoir l’exclusion de la juridiction de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression si celui-ci a eu lieu sur le territoire ou à l’égard des nationaux d’un État Partie au Statut de Rome qui n’a pas ratifié les amendements de Kampala et a choisi l’opt-out. Le représentant de la Palestine a pointé le fait qu’il s’agissait d’accorder l’immunité des nationaux et territoires de certains États, en instaurant le régime le plus restrictif pour un crime international. Il était particulièrement en faveur d’une activation consensuelle mais non d’une activation négociée en imposant le consentement nécessaire pour que les nationaux d’un État puissent être traduits devant la CPI et non d’une manière qui n’assure pas une protection suffisante aux États vulnérables. C’est pourtant seulement de cette manière et avec une telle clause que le consensus a pu être trouvé parmi les États, clause figurant au § 2 de la résolution finale ICC-ASP/16/L.10*.

Les défenseurs de cette clause dont le Canada, le Mexique, l’Espagne, le Venezuela, la France, le Royaume-Uni et le Japon souhaitaient également que le § 3 de la résolution réaffirmant les articles 40, § 1, et 119, § 1, du Statut de Rome relatifs à l’indépendance judiciaire des juges de la CPI soit déplacé de cette partie opérative au dernier paragraphe du Préambule. Ces États ont tenté d’imposer cette modification comme nécessaire pour parvenir au consensus. Néanmoins, plusieurs interventions des représentants des États opposés à cette ultime modification et renégociation de la résolution présentée comme finale par la Vice-Présidence de l’Assemblée, ont souligné l’indispensable indépendance judiciaire dont les juges doivent disposer dans l’exercice de leurs pouvoirs et ont fait valoir leur incompréhension à l’égard de la réticence de réaffirmer avec force ce principe fondamental dans le domaine de la justice. Ainsi, après plusieurs discussions et derniers temps de réflexion, cette demande de modification a été rejetée par le Vice-Président et la résolution a pu être adoptée en l’état, par consensus.

 

La publication de ce billet et la participation de Silviana à la 16e Assemblée des États Parties dans le cadre du Partenariat canadien pour la justice internationale ont été financées par le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada

Partnership logo

SSHRC-CRSH_FIP

Le crime d’agression : un nuage de fumée dans l’univers du droit ?

Day 10_Cocan_Agression_IntLawGrrls_Picture

@Picasso

L’activation de la compétence de la Cour pénale internationale (CPI) à l’égard du crime d’agression a fait l’objet de négociations entre les États Parties depuis le début de la 16ème Assemblée des États Parties à la CPI, le 4 décembre 2014, jusqu’au dernier jour de cet événement annuel, durant lequel le crime d’agression a été activé. Au terme de ces deux longues semaines de négociation, c’est l’occasion de s’interroger sur la nature et les multiples enjeux attachés à cet acte illicite.

Le crime d’agression présente un caractère multiforme au regard de l’ordre juridique international. Il renvoie tant à la responsabilité internationale de l’État en droit international public qu’à la responsabilité pénale individuelle au regard du droit international pénal, tant à la compétence affirmée du Conseil de sécurité dans l’identification d’un acte d’agression au titre de la Charte des Nations Unies qu’à la compétence éventuelle de la CPI en vertu du Statut de Rome et des Amendements de la Conférence de Kampala.

L’agression au regard du droit international public et du droit international pénal

Au regard du droit international public, l’article 2 § 4 de la Charte des Nations Unies a pour ambition la mise de l’agression hors la loi en affirmant que les États « s’abstiennent, dans leurs relations internationales, de recourir à la menace ou à l’emploi de la force, soit contre l’intégrité territoriale ou l’indépendance politique de tout État, soit de toute autre manière incompatible avec les buts des Nations Unies ». Si l’agression est le crime de l’État par excellence, depuis 1945, les contours du conflit armé classique opposants les forces armées régulières de deux ou plusieurs États semblent s’estomper en une nébuleuse croissante de conflits qui impliquent des acteurs non-étatiques aux côtés des ceux interétatiques. Ainsi, l’agression serait d’abord un fait internationalement illicite de l’État susceptible d’engager sa responsabilité internationale (voir le projet de la Commission du droit international (CDI) sur la responsabilité internationale des États). Néanmoins, l’État, en tant que personne morale, ne peut agir qu’à travers l’intermédiaire de ses dirigeants et représentants, personnes physiques. Si la personne morale dispose d’une personnalité juridique et que l’État est régi par un principe de continuité allant au-delà des personnes qui l’incarnent, pour pouvoir envisager un fait comme étant celui de l’État, il est nécessaire de procéder au rattachement du fait d’un individu à l’entité abstraite étatique (pour les règles de l’attribution d’un fait internationalement illicite à l’État, voir Projet de la CDI, Chapitre II, art. 4 à 11).

Parallèlement, au regard du droit international pénal, tout individu engage sa responsabilité pénale individuelle en commettant des actes contraires au droit international et plus particulièrement s’il est responsable des crimes internationaux les plus graves. Dès l’adoption du Statut de Rome, l’article 5, d) identifiait le crime d’agression comme un crime relevant de la compétence de la CPI au même titre que le crime de génocide, les crimes contre l’humanité et les crimes de guerre, ces quatre crimes étant identifiés comme les plus graves et touchant l’ensemble de la communauté internationale. Cette expression n’est pas sans rappeler l’obiter dictum célèbre de la Cour internationale de justice (CIJ) dans l’affaire Barcelona Traction dans laquelle la Cour avait affirmé qu’« une distinction essentielle doit en particulier être établie entre les obligations des États envers la communauté internationale dans son ensemble et celles qui naissent vis-à-vis d’un autre État dans le cadre de la protection diplomatique. Par leur nature même, les premières concernent tous les États. Vu l’importance des droits en cause, tous les États peuvent être considérés comme ayant un intérêt juridique à ce que ces droits soient protégés[, ces] obligations [étant] des obligations erga omnes » (§ 33, décision confirmée ici, ici et ici). À titre d’exemple, la Cour renvoyait précisément à l’interdiction des actes d’agression mais également au génocide ainsi qu’à d’autres principes et règles concernant les droits fondamentaux de la personne humaine tels que la protection contre la pratique de l’esclavage et la discrimination raciale (§ 34).

La résolution 3314 (XXIX) de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies (AGNU) relative à la définition de l’agression a été adoptée par consensus en 1974. Bien que n’ayant pas de portée juridiquement contraignante, elle est considérée comme relevant du droit international coutumier par la jurisprudence de la CIJ. Son article 1er définit l’agression comme «  l’emploi de la force armée par un État contre la souveraineté, l’intégrité territoriale ou l’indépendance politique d’un autre État, ou de toute autre manière incompatible avec la Charte des Nations Unies, ainsi qu’il ressort de la présente définition ». À la Conférence de révision de Kampala de 2010, les États ont adopté des amendements au Statut de Rome visant à définir le crime d’agression. L’article 8 bis, 1) le définit ainsi comme « la planification, la préparation, le lancement ou l’exécution par une personne effectivement en mesure de contrôler ou de diriger l’action politique ou militaire d’un État, d’un acte d’agression qui, par sa nature, sa gravité et son ampleur, constitue une violation manifeste de la Charte des Nations Unies ». En ce qui concerne la définition de l’acte d’agression et des actes spécifiques constitutifs, qu’il y ait ou non déclaration de guerre, le point 2) du même article renvoie à la résolution 3314 (XXIX) de l’AGNU. Les points de contact et d’interaction entre le droit international pénal et le droit international public sont ainsi cristallisés, le deuxième permettant de compléter le premier.

L’article 25 du Statut de la CPI relatif à la responsabilité pénale individuelle précise en son point 3) bis que « s’agissant du crime d’agression, les dispositions du présent article ne s’appliquent qu’aux personnes effectivement en mesure de contrôler ou de diriger l’action politique ou militaire d’un État ». Ainsi, l’agression ne peut être que le fait des hauts dirigeants et responsables d’un État titulaires d’une responsabilité de commandement au titre d’une organisation hiérarchique de la structure étatique. Néanmoins, le point 4) du même article ajoute qu’ « aucune disposition du présent Statut relative à la responsabilité pénale des individus n’affecte la responsabilité des États en droit international ». Ainsi, l’établissement de la responsabilité individuelle s’affirme comme étant sans incidence sur une éventuelle responsabilité de l’État, celles-ci étant considérées comme distinctes, plutôt que complémentaires. Cette approche semble critiquable en ce qui concerne le crime d’agression, notamment au regard des principes de l’attribution des faits des personnes physiques à l’État codifiés dans le projet de la CDI sur la responsabilité internationale étatique. Si une personne est effectivement en mesure de contrôler ou de diriger l’action politique ou militaire d’un État, il semblerait qu’elle agisse à titre d’organe officiel de l’État, organe de jure ou de facto tel que défini par le droit interne (voir les articles 5 à 11 du Projet de la CDI précédemment cités). Dès lors, en cas d’établissement de la responsabilité pénale individuelle pour un crime d’agression commis par une personne physique répondant à de tels critères, il serait logique d’établir la responsabilité internationale de l’État dans la mesure où l’acte illicite de l’agression lui serait directement attribuable, ces deux types de responsabilité s’inscrivant dans un rapport de complémentarité.

Les conditions d’exercice de la compétence de la CPI à l’égard du crime d’agression

L’article 13 du Statut de Rome dispose que la CPI exerce sa compétence à l’égard d’un des crimes visés par l’article 5 si sa situation est déférée au Procureur par un État partie, conformément à l’article 14; par le Conseil de sécurité agissant au titre du Chapitre VII de la Charte des Nations Unies ou encore si le Procureur a ouvert une enquête, proprio motu, en vertu de l’article 15.

Au regard de l’article 15 bis, la compétence de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression ne pouvait s’exercer qu’un an après l’acceptation des amendements de Kampala par au moins 30 États. La Palestine a été le 30ème État à ratifier ces amendements, rendant ainsi possible l’ouverture des négociations quant à l’activation de la compétence de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression lors de l’AÉP16. Le point 4) de l’article 15 bis précise que la Cour peut « exercer sa compétence à l’égard d’un crime  d’agression résultant d’un acte d’agression commis par un État Partie à moins que cet État Partie n’ait préalablement déclaré qu’il n’acceptait pas une telle compétence ». En ce qui concerne un État qui n’est pas Partie au Statut de Rome, la même disposition exclut la compétence de la Cour lorsque le crime a été commis par des ressortissants de cet État ou sur son territoire. Durant les négociations menées dans le cadre de l’AÉP16, le consensus quant à l’activation de la compétence de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression a toujours été l’objectif premier, les États ne souhaitant pas avoir recours au vote pour obtenir la majorité qualifiée de 2/3 exigée. À la tombée de la nuit du dernier jour de l’AÉP16, les États ont pu obtenir le consensus nécessaire pour activer le crime d’agression. À ce stade, il apparaît opportun d’apprécier le rôle joué par le Conseil de sécurité dans la constatation d’un acte d’agression au regard du Chapitre VII des Nations Unies et de s’interroger sur l’interaction avec la compétence de la Cour à l’égard du crime d’agression.

La part de l’interprétation dans la constatation d’un acte d’agression par le Conseil de sécurité

En vertu de l’article 24, § 1 de la Charte des Nations Unies, le Conseil de sécurité est investi de la responsabilité principale en matière de maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales. Au regard de l’article 39, il lui incombe de constater toute menace contre la paix, toute rupture contre la paix ainsi que la survenance de tout acte d’agression. Comme la définition de l’agression ne lie pas le Conseil qui juge de la qualification en fonction des circonstances de la situation et plus particulièrement en fonction de la gravité de l’acte ou de ses conséquences, conformément à l’article 4 de la résolution 3314, il dispose ainsi d’une entière liberté d’appréciation. Par ailleurs, l’article 39 stipule que le Conseil ne fait que « constater » une situation. Cette « constatation » implique inévitablement une opération de qualification juridique puisque le Conseil dispose d’un pouvoir d’appréciation discrétionnaire au titre du Chapitre VII. Dès lors, la constatation est constitutive puisqu’il n’y a de menace contre la paix, de rupture de la paix ou d’acte d’agression seulement lorsque le Conseil en décide ainsi en l’absence de définitions strictes et générales. Le texte de l’article 39 laisse entendre que la réalité préexistante est simplement à constater par le Conseil, alors que les notions visées font l’objet d’appréciations diverses quant à leur contenu ou à leur sens dans la mesure où ces notions dépendant du contexte et des éléments factuels. Cependant, l’article 24 § 2 fixe des limites générales au pouvoir discrétionnaire du Conseil de sécurité. Il stipule que « dans l’accomplissement de ses devoirs, le Conseil de Sécurité agit conformément aux buts et principes des Nations Unies », à savoir conformément aux articles 1 et 2 de la Charte.

La particularité essentielle de l’article 39 réside dans le fait que l’organe titulaire du pouvoir de qualification est également l’organe chargé de la mise en œuvre de la sanction (articles 41 et 42 de la Charte) mais cela ne veut pas dire qu’à travers la constatation, le Conseil de sécurité porte un jugement sur la responsabilité internationale de l’État ou la responsabilité pénale individuelle, envisagées de manière « subjective », mais un jugement sur la situation objective identifiée. Il s’agit d’une appréciation politique qui ne comporte pas nécessairement de conséquences juridiques puisque le Conseil est l’organe responsable du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales et non l’organe en charge du respect du droit.

L’interaction entre les compétences du Conseil de sécurité et celles de la CPI

En ce qui concerne la CPI, l’article 15 ter, 4) dispose que « le constat d’un acte d’agression par un organe extérieur à la Cour est sans préjudice des constatations que fait la Cour elle-même en vertu du présent Statut ». A contrario, si le Conseil de sécurité qualifie une intervention armée de menace ou rupture contre la paix et non comme un acte agression, la CPI aurait-elle la légitimité et la possibilité d’identifier cette même situation comme étant un crime d’agression ? Cette qualification de la Cour aurait-elle une véritable autorité juridique et recevrait-elle une coopération de la part des États en allant à l’encontre de la constatation du Conseil alors même que ce dernier est investi d’une autorité politique renforcée et d’un pouvoir de coercition au titre du Chapitre VII ? Enfin, la disposition de l’article ne mentionne pas expressément le Conseil de sécurité, mais « un organe extérieur » à la Cour qui pourrait aussi être éventuellement la Cour internationale de Justice qui aurait compétence sur un tel différend interétatique en tant qu’organe judiciaire principal des Nations Unies, pourvu que les États aient accepté de se soumettre à sa juridiction. Il y aurait ainsi un risque de conflits de juridictions, chacune exerçant un pouvoir d’interprétation.

Pour le moment, l’article 15 bis détaille la procédure de déclenchement des poursuites en cas d’un crime d’agression allégué. Le point 6) dispose si le Procureur conclut qu’il existe une base raisonnable pour mener une enquête pour crime d’agression, il s’assure que le Conseil de sécurité a constaté qu’un acte d’agression a été commis par l’État en cause et avise le Secrétaire général des Nations Unies de cette situation. Cette disposition renvoie à une nécessaire et étroite collaboration entre le Bureau du Procureur et le Conseil de Sécurité. Interprétée de manière restrictive, elle semble même subordonner l’ouverture d’une enquête par le Procureur, de sa propre initiative, à une constatation initiale du Conseil qui irait dans le sens de l’existence d’un acte d’agression.

En effet, selon le point 7), si une telle constatation du Conseil a eu lieu, le Procureur peut enquêter sur le crime. Ainsi, le point 8) précise que lorsqu’une telle constatation n’a pas eu lieu dans les six mois suivant la date de l’avis, si la Section préliminaire autorise le Procureur à ouvrir une enquête pour crime d’agression, il peut procéder ainsi, mais à la condition « que le Conseil de sécurité n’en ait pas décidé autrement, conformément à l’article 16 ». Cet article habilite le Conseil à demander un sursis à enquêter ou à poursuivre tout crime pour lequel la Cour est compétente en vertu du Statut, et ce, pendant les douze mois suivant la date d’une telle décision adressée à la Cour dans une résolution adoptée en vertu du Chapitre VII. Par ailleurs, cette demande peut être renouvelée par le Conseil dans les mêmes conditions.

Dans le cadre du crime d’agression, crime politique et crime de l’État qui va à l’encontre de l’interdiction du recours à la force dans la conduite des relations internationales, une telle disposition comme l’article 16 du Statut de Rome semble instaurer un contrôle de la part du Conseil de sécurité à l’égard de la CPI. En effet, un sursis à enquêter ou à poursuivre peut être demandé à un organe juridictionnel, par un organe politique qui a la responsabilité principale du maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationale. Ainsi, il semblerait que même si la compétence de la Cour est activée à l’égard du crime d’agression, son exercice restera délicat dans la mesure où les États, en particulier les États membres permanents du Conseil de sécurité, disposant d’un droit de veto, pourront bloquer l’adoption d’une résolution visant à la constatation d’un acte d’agression tout en pouvant démontrer l’existence d’un consensus dans l’adoption d’une résolution sur la base du Chapitre VII en vue de neutraliser l’initiative d’investigations ou de poursuites du Procureur de la CPI. La puissance et les intérêts des États pourront ainsi engendrer éventuellement tant des zones de non-droit qu’une application du droit à géométrie variable orientée envers les États les plus faibles, dont les points de vue seront neutralisés, face à une Cour immobilisée en raison des actions du Conseil de sécurité.

La publication de ce billet et la participation de Silviana à la 16e Assemblée des États Parties dans le cadre du Partenariat canadien pour la justice internationale ont été financées par le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada.

Partnership logoSSHRC-CRSH_FIP

The Crime of Aggression under International Criminal Law: Links with Refugee Law

The 16th Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court is already more than halfway done. Many of the themes at the ASP this year is worthy of note, including the election of six new judges, planning for the 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, as well as consideration of activation of the International Criminal Court’s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression.

Of particular interest is the ICC’s activation of the crime of aggression, which will be the focus of this blog post. The crime of aggression is defined under the Rome Statute as ‘the planning, preparation, initiation or execution, by a person in a position effectively to exercise control over or to direct the political or military action of a State, of an act of aggression which, by its character, gravity and scale, constitutes a manifest violation of the Charter of the United Nations’. The activation and exercise of the ICC’s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression is of significance because there are outstanding jurisdictional issues which are to be discussed at the ASP, including whether all States Parties are subjected to the ICC’s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression, or whether only States Parties which have ratified the crime of aggression amendments are subjected to the ICC’s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression (see Coalition of the ICC Backgrounder). This blog post will consider the impact the activation of the crime of aggressions may have on international refugee law.

ASP Work Programme

ASP Work Programme

One can see several parallels between international criminal law and refugee law. While at first glance, international criminal and refugee law may seem distinct from one another, in fact, when operating together, these two fields of law may enhance the functions of the other. First, the purposes of international criminal law and refugee law draw parallels with one another. Second, while international refugee law regime’s main purpose is to protect refugees, in order to do so, it must also protect the institution for asylum, by preventing those who have committed grave crimes from gaining refugee status and corresponding protection. Here, international refugee law borrows from international criminal law so as to ascertain what type of individuals would be excluded from international protection.

 One view of international criminal law’s purpose is to bring justice to victims through the prosecution of an individual for international crimes, i.e. by holding an individual liable for committing mass atrocities. The command responsibility rule is illustrative of this purpose in that high-ranking individuals can be held responsible for crimes committed by their subordinates. One view of international refugee law is that it offers the widest protection to those deserving through the granting of refugee status. Article 1F(a) of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (Refugee Convention) prevents those who are undeserving of international protection from benefiting from that protection. This provision applies to those who have committed crimes prior to admission as refugees. Article 1F acts to preserve the institution of asylum, and to safeguard the receiving country from criminals who present a danger to that country’s security. Borrowing from international criminal law, international refugee law determines who is deserving of refugee status by excluding those who have committed serious international crimes. By working together, international criminal law brings perpetrators to justice, while international refugee law excludes those who try to find safe havens through acquiring refugee status and corresponding protection.

International refugee law borrows from international criminal law when determining which individuals would be excluded from refugee status under Article 1F(a) of the Refugee Convention. Under Article 1F(a), individuals are excluded from refugee status and corresponding protection where there are ‘serious reasons for considering that: (a) he has committed a crime against peace, a war crime, or a crime against humanity, as defined in the international instruments drawn up to make provision in respect of such crimes’. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has stated that ‘a ‘crime of aggression’ is essentially a ‘crime against peace’’ in its commentary. A crime against peace is defined as ‘the use of armed force by a State against the sovereignty, territorial integrity or political independence of another State, or in any manner inconsistent with the Charter of the United Nations’. This definition of a crime against peace was drawn from the United Nations General Assembly 1974 definition of ‘aggression’ and such definition has been retained in the International Law Commission’s Draft Code of Crimes against the Peace and Security of Mankind. As can be seen, international refugee law draws upon international criminal law in defining the relevant crimes under Article 1F(a) of the Refugee Convention. This type of close relationship between international criminal and refugee law may enhance respect for the rule of law internationally, while preventing individuals who do not deserve to be protected under the international refugee law regime from attaining refugee status.

As briefly demonstrated, while both international criminal law and refugee law may serve different functions, these two branches of international law, when operating together, may draw upon the other to enhance international respect for the rule of law. The negotiation between States Parties at the ASP will likely clarify the activation and jurisdiction of the ICC over the crime of aggression, which may, in turn, inform how Article 1F(a) may be interpreted by international refugee law adjudicators. Now more than ever, the institution for asylum must be protected from potential abuse by perpetrators of international crimes, so that only those deserving may be given the widest possible protection under the international refugee law regime.

This blogpost and Jenny Poon’s attendance to the 16th Assembly of States Parties in the framework of the Canadian Partnership for International Justice was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Partnership logoSSHRC-CRSH_FIP