Go On! The New York International Law Review’s 30th Anniversary Symposium

Description

The Symposium & Dinner celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the New York International Law Review (NYILR) by examining the unique role of New York State in international legal practice. This Symposium will bring together the lawyers, judges, scholars, arbitrators, policy makers and activists who engage in this global practice of law in New York. These experts will address how New York leads in these areas of international practice – where it succeeds, where it falls short and what trends in international practice we are likely to see in the decades ahead.

You may register for either or both events. Dinner is $125. The symposium is free, however registration is required.

Thursday, April 12 Dinner ($125)

Dinner will be held at the New York Athletic Club on Thursday, April 12, 2018 beginning at 6:30 pm. Space is limited. Please RSVP early.

6:30 p.m.— Cocktail Reception (President’s Room)

7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. — Dinner (Olympic Suites 1-5)

Dinner Speaker: D. Stephen Mathias, Assistant Secretary-General for Legal Affairs at United Nations

Friday, April 13 Symposium (Free)

The Symposium will be held on Friday, April 13, 2018 at St. John’s University School of Law, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Queens, NY.

The entire day’s program will also qualify for 4.5 non-transitional practice CLE credits with an additional $75 payment. If you want CLE credit, please 1. Register on this site and 2. Download and return the CLE form. (St. John’s University School of Law has been certified by the New York State Continuing Legal Education Board as an Accredited Provider of Continuing Legal Education in the State of New York.)

8:30 a.m.- 9:15 a.m. — Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:15 a.m. — Introductory Remarks

Professor Peggy McGuinness, Director of LL.M. in Transnational Legal Practice Program &
Co-Director of St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law

9:30 a.m.- 11:10 a.m. — Panel One: New York and Cross-Border Dispute Resolution

This panel will address the ways in which New York law has become the standard law to apply to international commercial contracts – how New York courts and, increasingly, New York mediation and arbitration providers have become leaders in cross-border dispute resolution.

Moderator: Nancy M. Thevenin, Esq., Chair of the New York State Bar Association International Section & Adjunct Professor of Law at St. John’s University School of Law

Panelists: E. Alexandra Dosman, Dosman Law & New York International Arbitration Center; James P. Duffy IV, Esq., Partner, Baker & McKenzie, New York, NY; Anibal Martin Sabater, Esq., Partner, Chaffetz & Lindsey LLP, New York, NY; Yasuhiro Saito, Esq., Partner at Saito Law Group PLLC, New York, NY

11:20 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Panel Two: International Deals and Investment in New York

Panelists will discuss how New York serves as the center of international deal making, including cross-border mergers and acquisitions, real estate development and investment, and international licensing of intellectual property. Panelists will also address challenges to New York legal primacy from other financial centers in Europe, China and elsewhere.

Moderator: Professor Christopher J. Borgen, Co-Director of St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law

Panelists: Richard F. Hans, Esq., Managing Partner and Global Co-Chairman of Financial Services Sector DLA Piper, New York, NY; Mark A. Meyer, Esq., Member, Herzfeld & Rubin, P.C., New York, NY; Christina Tsesmelis, Esq., Head of Global Anti-Corruption and AML, Privacy Officer at Neuberger Berman; Amanda Rottermund, Esq., Withersworldwide, New York, NY

1:15 p.m.-2:25 p.m. — Lunch

Lunch Speaker and Recipient of Award for Distinction in International Law and Affairs: Judge Iris Yassmin Barrios Aguilar, President, Guatemala High Risk Court

2:30 p.m.- 4:10 p.m. — Panel Three: Global Politics and Public International Law in New York

Panelists will discuss New York’s participation and influences in global problems and how solutions are reached through international cooperation and international law, particularly in the areas of efforts to address environmental harms, human rights, and terrorism.

Moderator: Professor Peggy McGuinness, Director of LL.M. in Transnational Legal Practice Program & Co-Director of St. John’s Center for International and Comparative Law

Panelists: Anil Kalhan, Esq., Associate Professor of Law at Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law & Chair of International Human Rights Committee at New York City Bar Association; Sarah Friedman, Esq., General Counsel for the Mayor’s Office for International Affairs; JoAnn Kamuf Ward, Esq., Director of the Institute’s Human Rights in the US Projector at Columbia Law School

4:15 p.m-5:30 p.m. — Cocktail Reception

You may register here.

Write On! Albert S. Pergam International Law Writing Competition Award

To foster legal scholarship among law students in the field of international law. The competition is intended to encourage students of law to write on areas of public or private international law. The Section believes that by providing a forum for students to disseminate their ideas and articles, the professional and academic communities are enriched. Furthermore, the competition presents an opportunity for students to submit law review quality articles to the Section for possible publication in one of its publications.

Presented by: International Section of the New York State Bar Association
Contact:  Tiffany Bardwell
Nomination Deadline: Entries should be emailed by 4:00 p.m., Friday, November 10, 2017 to the staff liaison.
Date Presented: January 2018 Annual Meeting
Award Criteria: Articles must be submitted (in English), and emailed to tbardwell@nysba.org, double-spaced on 8 1/2″ x 11″ paper with one-inch margins, be no longer than 35 pages in length (including footnotes/endnotes). Citations are to conform with “A Uniform System of Citation” (The Blue Book).

All articles submitted for the competition become the property of the Section. No article submitted may be published in any journal or periodical other than the “New York State Bar Journal,” the “New York International Law and Review,” or the “International Law Practicum,” until after announcement of the winner of this competition in January.

Law students (including J.D., LL.M., Ph.D. and S.J.D. candidates) are cordially invited to submit an entry. Entries will be judged on a variety of factors including significance and timeliness of the subject matter, thoroughness of research and analysis, and clarity of writing style.

Please provide your permanent address, current email address and daytime phone number.

Prize Awarded: $2,000 and publication of the article (subject to editorial approval) in aforementioned publications.

Past Recipients of this Award

2017 Brochure

Work On! ICCT Advanced Summer Programme

Work On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 8.43.00 PMThe International Centre for Counter Terrorism with the T.M.C. Asser Institute is hosting an Advanced Summer Programme on August 28-September 1, 2017, at The Hague. Theme is “Countering Terrorism: Legal Challenges and Dilemmas.” Deadline to register is July 23, 2017. Details here. Preliminary programme here.

Nuevo libro para abogados hispano- y angloparlantes/New Book for Lawyers Who Speak Both Spanish and English

(English version follows)

Tres mujeres y profesoras de derecho: S.I. Strong de la Universidad de Missouri (Estados Unidos), Katia Fach Gómez de la Universidad de Zaragoza (España) y Laura Carballo Piñeiro de la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (España) tenemos el honor de presentar el libro Derecho comparado para abogados anglo- e hispanoparlantes: Culturas jurídicas, términos jurídicos y prácticas jurídicas/ Comparative Law for Spanish-English Speaking Lawyers: Legal Cultures, Legal Terms and Legal Practices  (Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2016). Este trabajo supone una plasmación por escrito de algunas de las características más relevantes de nuestras carreras profesionales: trayectorias académicas y de práctica de la abogacía internacional desarrolladas en español e inglés, y en estrecho contacto con las comunidades jurídicas latinoamericana, europea y estadounidense. En consonancia con ello, la obra que hemos elaborado permite que abogados y estudiantes de derecho que hablan inglés y español adquieran fluidez jurídica en un segundo idioma. Realizar dicho esfuerzo es extremadamente importante no sólo para abogados especializados en derecho internacional, sino también para abogados dedicados al derecho nacional pero que tratan con clientes cuya lengua materna es un idioma extranjero.

La forma en que “Derecho comparado para abogados anglo- e hispanoparlantes” involucra a abogados y estudiantes de derecho en la práctica jurídica bilingüe es única por diversos motivos. En primer lugar, y dado que la mayoría de los abogados bilingües trabajan con otros abogados y con clientes que cuentan con unos orígenes legales y culturales muy variados, el libro no se limita a analizar unas jurisdicciones concretas. Por el contrario, el libro ofrece información sobre diversos países hispanoparlantes (fundamentalmente, España y México) y angloparlantes (fundamentalmente, Estados Unidos y Reino Unido). En segundo lugar, la monografía contextualiza la información, no sólo ubicando el nuevo vocabulario y los principios legales en el contexto lingüístico apropiado –el libro es completamente bilingüe-, sino también ofreciendo abundantes comparaciones con la legislación y la práctica de otras jurisdicciones. En tercer lugar, este tipo de análisis permite que los abogados y estudiantes de derecho aprecien las diferencias existentes en las culturas jurídicas, empresariales y sociales relevantes. Ello ayuda a los lectores a no incurrir en ofensas que puedan derivarse de problemas de comunicación involuntarios. El libro también explica por qué existen dichas diferencias y cuál es su fundamento en un contexto jurídico determinado.

Profundizar en la comprensión a través de barreras nacionales, sociales y culturales es un objetivo esencial de un mundo cada vez más pluralizado. Derecho comparado para abogados anglo- e hispanoparlantes es una herramienta muy útil para aquellos que trabajan cruzando fronteras lingüísticas. Como este libro de 700 páginas demuestra, no hay que temer a las diferencias, sino que hemos de alegrarnos de que la diversidad jurídica y lingüística exista.

***

unnamedThree law professors – S.I. Strong of the University of Missouri, Katia Fach Gómez of the University of Zaragoza and Laura Carballo Piñeiro of the University of Santiago de Compostela – have the honor of presenting their new book, Comparative Law for Spanish-English Speaking Lawyers: Legal Cultures, Legal Terms and Legal Practices / Derecho comparado para abogados anglo- e hispanoparlantes: Culturas jurídicas, términos jurídicos y prácticas jurídicas (Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd., 2016).  This work reflects some of the characteristics that are most relevant to our professional careers as academics and practitioners working in both English and Spanish, and involving jurisdictions in Latin America, Europe and the United States.  Consistent with that, the book that we have written helps lawyers and law students who speak Spanish and English become legally fluent in their second language.  This effort is extremely important not only for specialists in international law, but also for domestic lawyers whose clients speak different languages.

 

Comparative Law for Spanish-English Speaking Lawyers: Legal Cultures, Legal Terms and Legal Practices / Derecho comparado para abogados anglo- e hispanoparlantes” introduces lawyers and law students to bilingual legal practice in several ways.  First, the book does not focus solely on single jurisdictions, since most bilingual lawyers work with clients and co-counsel from a variety of legal and cultural backgrounds.  Instead, the book offers information on several English-speaking nations (primarily the U.S. and the U.K.) and Spanish-speaking countries (primarily Spain, Mexico and Argentina).  Second, the text seeks to contextualize the information, not only by placing the new vocabulary and legal principles in the appropriate linguistic setting (the book is entirely bilingual) but by providing extensive comparisons to the law and practice of other jurisdictions.  Third, the discussion helps lawyers and law students appreciate differences in the relevant legal, business and social cultures, thereby helping them avoid giving offense through any inadvertent miscommunications, and explains why those differences arose and why they make sense in that particular legal environment.

 

Increasing understanding across national, social and cultural lines is an important goal in our increasingly pluralistic world, and Comparative Law for Spanish-English Speaking Lawyers provides a useful tool for those who work across linguistic lines.  As this 700+ page text shows, legal and linguistic differences need not be feared but can instead be celebrated.

 

Call for Submissions: Melbourne Journal of International Law

The Editors of the Melbourne Journal of International Law (‘MJIL’), Australia’s premier generalist international law journal, are now inviting submissions for volume 18(1). The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2017MJIL is a peer-reviewed academic journal based at the University of Melbourne which publishes innovative scholarly research and critical examination of issues in international law. Submissions and inquiries should be directed to law-mjil@unimelb.edu.au. For more information please visit http://law.unimelb.edu.au/mjil/submissions.

Write On! Read On! “Inter Gentes”: a new kind of international law journal

Yesterday a buzzing social event at McGill Faculty of Law marked the launch of a new peer reviewed international law journal – but rather than adding to the existing plethora of academic journals, Inter Gentes is breaking the mold and doing something truly exciting and innovative. And they welcome your submissions in many different, multi-media forms.

intergentes-logo

The name Inter Gentes represents the ethos of this journal, to consider international law not according to the traditional 19th Century conception of law between States, but rather as law between people. This goes far beyond a “transnational” or “transboundary” approach, and is broader than “legal pluralism” or “cosmopolitanism”. The intention is to create debate and interaction on the way in which international law affects individuals and peoples, and the way in which we affect international law.

To facilitate this debate, Inter Gentes is an open access online journal, with no paper print issues. This reduces the overheads for the team producing the bi-annual publication, but more importantly ensures true international accessibility.

Inter Gentes will be publishing articles in English, French and Spanish, all of which will be peer-reviewed by members of the star-studded Advisory Board, including Bruno Simma; Francois Crepeau, the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights of Migrants; Mark Drumbl; Lorie Graham; Sally Engel Merry; Jens Ohlin; Rene Provost; Juan Carlos Sainz Borgo and others. The expertise of the Advisory Board will guarantee the quality of the work published, but the real footwork will be undertaken by a dedicated team of students at McGill Faculty of Law, a faculty renowned for it’s commitment to linguistic and legal diversity, and which attracts students from all over the world.

As well as the peer-reviewed articles published in the bi-annual themed issues, Inter Gentes will have op-ed dialogues, encourage debate and dialogue among readers through interactive comments platforms, and provide multi-media content in the form of podcasts, images, posters and more. Since 2015 it has been creating ad-hoc content in the form of editorials, and it will continue this alongside it’s bi-annual issues.

inter-gentes-inaugural-cover

The inaugural edition has the theme “International Law and Peoples’ Resistance”, and it is testament to the commitment and ethos of this new journal that the articles included are written by authors from around the world, from perspectives as diverse as indigenous law and international law as colonialism; self determination as resistance; and global participation in global democracy.

The theme for next Spring is “(In)tangible Ownership in the International Sphere”, looking at diverse notions of property and land rights. The deadline for the Spring edition has now passed,  however the editorial team is happy to receive op-ed pieces on topics related to this theme.

Keep an eye out for this exciting new platform, which really is an expression of twenty-first century perspectives, dialogues, multi-media forms of knowledge dissemination and learning, and diverse identities. And let the editorial team know if you have something you’d like to submit – they  accept non-thematic articles on any area of international law year round on a rolling basis, which will be considered for ad-hoc publication, outside the publishing schedule for the theme issues

 

Joanna Madej: Presentation at ApacheCon 2016

One of the main questions of contemporary (international) law comes from the increasingly blurred line between the public and private— how do we treat private organizations taking on the responsibilities and roles previously firmly grounded in the public sphere? In an increasingly digitized world, the dichotomies between the public and private are disappearing at a rapid pace. As greater parts of individuals’ daily lives occur through interfaces and online, the norms regulating software companies become increasingly relevant beyond the world of computer scientists.
Rather than looking at government regulation of technology, in my presentation at the Apache Software Foundation’s ApacheCon, I addressed how software companies regulate themselves. Exploring the formation of open standards, I drew parallels between how software companies and states form binding agreements. Looking at software companies and states, I examined “anarchic” environments, the roles of consortia as venues for agreements and compared de jure and de facto standards with customary and treaty-based law— ultimately identifying an “international politics” of software.