Write on! Conference Call for Papers – 13th Annual IHL – Detention

The Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Israel and the Occupied Territories are organizing an international conference that seeks to evaluate recent developments in the law and practice related to detention mostly in relation to armed conflict.

The conference, the 13th in the series of Minerva/ICRC annual international conferences on IHL, is scheduled for 12-13 November 2018 in Jerusalem.

Recipients of this call for papers are invited to submit proposals to present a paper at the conference.  Authors of selected proposals will be offered full or partial flight and accommodation expenses.

Submission deadline: 15 July 2018

For further details, see the call attached, or at https://en.law.huji.ac.il/news/conference-call-papers-13th-annual-ihl-detention.

Conference Call for Papers – IHL – Detention

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Write on (and Go!) 11th Annual Minerva-ICRC International Conference on Contemporary Challenges in International Humanitarian Law Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 28-29 November 2016

Let me start with a personal view as a participant and organizer:

This multi-day conference series – a collaboration between the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Israel and the Occupied Territories – has become a significant annual event in the IHL world. The list of speakers who have participated in the first decade of conferences reads like a veritable who’s who of IHL scholars and practitioners, and by our count at least 70 of the papers presented at these conferences have resulted in articles published in top peer-reviewed journals (including our own Israel Law Review).

Introduction

The Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Israel and the Occupied Territories are organizing an international conference that seeks to explore cutting-edge issues in the field of international humanitarian law (IHL).

The conference, the eleventh in the series of Minerva-ICRC Annual International Conferences on IHL, is scheduled for 28-29 November 2016 in Jerusalem.

Recipients of this call for papers are invited to submit proposals to present an original paper at the conference. Authors of selected proposals will be offered full or partial flight and accommodation expenses.

Submission deadline: 1 July 2016

Background

Contemporary conflict patterns have created a myriad of complex issues in the field of international humanitarian law, which the 11th Annual Minerva-ICRC Conference on International Humanitarian Law seeks to address.

In armed conflicts across the globe, civilians continue to bear the brunt of the hostilities, especially when fighting takes place in densely populated areas or when civilians are deliberately targeted. Thousands of people are being detained, often outside of any legal framework and are often subjected to ill treatment or inadequate conditions of detention. The number of persons displaced as a result of armed conflict is also dramatic and the number of internally displaced persons, refugees and asylum seekers uprooted by ongoing armed conflicts worldwide has soared in the past two years.

Additionally, the increase in the number and complexity of parties to a conflict is a noticeable feature of contemporary armed conflicts. On the State side, the number of foreign interventions in many ongoing armed conflicts contributes substantially to the multiplication of actors involved. In parallel, on the non-State side, a myriad of fluid, multiplying and fragmenting armed groups frequently take part in the fighting. The spillover of hostilities into neighboring countries, their geographical expanse and their regionalization have also become a distinctive feature of many contemporary armed conflicts – partly as a consequence of foreign involvements.

Violations of IHL, committed both by States and non-State actors continue to be a primary feature of contemporary conflicts. In many situations, this is linked to a denial of the applicability or relevance of IHL. On the part of non-State armed groups, there is sometimes a rejection of IHL, which some parties do not feel bound by. In addition to this, recent armed conflicts have seen a rise in the deliberate commission of violations of IHL by some non-State armed groups and their use of media to publicize those violations. On the part of States, it is often, though not always, the result of counterterrorism measures and discourses, which seem to be hardening with time. It remains the case that some States deny the existence of armed conflicts, rendering dialogue difficult on the humanitarian consequences of the conflict and the protection of those affected by it.

Against this backdrop, the conference academic committee invites recipients to submit proposals to present a paper at the conference dealing with one of the following contemporary challenges of IHL:

  • Rights and obligations of non-State armed groups;
  • IHL and vulnerable groups of persons (including asylum seekers, women, minors, etc.);
  • Enforcement and implementation of IHL by States;
  • IHL and the environment;
  • The development of IHL in national and international jurisprudence.

The committee also welcomes additional proposals on other relevant and contemporary issues in the field of IHL.

Submissions

Researchers interested in addressing these and other issues are invited to respond to this call for papers with a 1-2 page proposal for an article and presentation, along with a brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by email to the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (mchr@savion.huji.ac.il) no later than 1 July 2016.

Applicants should expect notification of the committee’s decision by 1 August 2016. Written contributions (of approx. 10-25 pages) based on the selected proposals will be expected no later than 1 November 2016. The Israel Law Review (a Cambridge University Press publication) has expressed interest in publishing selected full length papers based on conference presentations, subject to its standard review and editing procedures.

Conference Academic Committee

Prof. Yuval Shany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Chair)

Mr. Larry Maybee, ICRC, Israel and the Occupied Territories

Prof. Yaël Ronen, Israel Law Review, Minerva Center for Human Rights, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Dr. Re’em Segev, Minerva Center for Human Rights, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Mr. Charles Shamas, The Mattin Group

Adv. Danny Evron, Minerva Center for Human Rights, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Adv. Miya Keren-Abraham, ICRC, Israel and the Occupied Territories

Adv. Alon Margalit, ICRC, Israel and the Occupied Territories

Write on! Book Reviews

Writing book reviews is a lucrative business: the author gets both a free copy of the book, and another entry in the list of publication. If you’re interested in either, read on and write on!

The journal:

The Israel Law Review (published by CUP) seeks reviewers for books recently published in the areas of human rights, international and public law. Our book review policy is here.

The Israel Law Review is a double-blind peer reviewed journal established in 1966, published by Cambridge University Press under the auspices and management of the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Law Faculty of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Under this stewardship, it focuses on scholarship in the fields of human rights, public law and international law. The Editors-in-Chief of the journal are Prof. Sir Nigel Rodley, University of Essex, UK, and Prof. Yuval Shany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

We publish reviews of two types: 

Short reviews, which provide the reader with an overview of the general content, scope and overall quality of the text. The deadline for short reviews is usually two months from the time in which the reviewer receives the text, although adjustments are possible where necessary.

Review essays (3,000-10,000 words), which place the reviewed text within the field of law addressed by the author and provide deeper analysis of the underlying assumptions or theories proposed in the text. The deadline for review essays is usually three months from the time in which the reviewer receives the text, although adjustments are possible where necessary.

What to do next:

One book for which we are specifically seeking a reviewer at this point is: Steven Freeland, Addressing the Intentional Destruction of the Environment during Warfare under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (Intersentia, 2015). This may whet your appetite to read the book.

We have numerous other books on our list (until the list is posted on the Cambridge Journals Online website please contact the academic editor, Prof. Yaël Ronen, at yael.ronen@mail.huji.ac.il for details), and are happy to consider any publication within our mandate, so feel free to make your suggestion.

If you are interested in reviewing a book, whether on our list or otherwise,  please send an email with a brief description of your professional background and interest in reviewing the book to the academic editor of the journal, Prof. Yaël Ronen, at yael.ronen@mail.huji.ac.il. Please also attach a CV. Let us know if you have the book in your possession. If not, we will arrange to have it sent to you by the publisher (either in hard copy or in e-copy, depending on the publisher’s policy).

For additional information, please contact the academic editor, Prof. Yaël Ronen, at yael.ronen@mail.huji.ac.il.

Write On! Israel Law Review

My professional world is overwhelmingly masculine. My own niches, issues of international status of territories and the laws of armed conflict, might be particularly vulnerable to voluntary gender selection, but they are hardly exceptional. When I think “international law scholars”, I mostly think “men”.

IntlawGrrls challenges this bias by offering a platform for feminine scholarship. Crucial to this, as its mission statement declares, is to be particularly mindful of foregrounding voices of junior lawyers and scholars and others who are less often heard in international legal dialogue. But blogging should be only the beginning of exposure. Unless and until we change the form of academia, the ultimate test is publication.

By and large, men publish more and are more likely to be cited than women, in international law as in other areas of law. I don’t believe this reflects any intentional policy; editors are hardly likely to refuse to publish an article because its author is a woman (They might not even be aware of gender, as I can attest from the numerous times I’ve been addressed as Mr. Ronen). There are various plausible explanations, such as that women write on less popular topics, that there are fewer women than men in the higher academic levels, and that women submit less journal articles than men. All these ‘explanations’ themselves give cause for concern: why are ‘feminine’ topics rated less highly? Why do women not progress as much as men? Why are women less confident than men? These are existential problems; resolving them requires a restructuring of society. And as we all push forward, including in the face of occasional adversity, we should put our awareness to good use. Even if we only see the tip of the iceberg, we can still chip it.

As an editor of a peer-reviewed law review, I try to keep women scholarship visible and effective. Our citation format requires that first names be spelt out, as initials are notoriously known for obfuscating female authors; wherever possible we seek peer reviews from women scholars; and we encourage female students to become involved in leadership positions in the editorial board.

But most importantly, we aim to publish scholarship that is as representative as possible of human diversity, whether it be in terms of gender, geography or view point. This does not mean giving undue preference to women authors. There is no need for that; female scholars need no special allowances to count among the best, only the opportunity.

Israel Law Review Call for submissions

The Israel Law Review (published by CUP) invites submissions on areas of interest in human rights, international and public law.

The Israel Law Review is a double-blind peer reviewed journal established in 1966, published by Cambridge University Press under the auspices and management of the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Law Faculty of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Under this stewardship, it focuses on scholarship in the fields of human rights, public law and international law. The Chief editors of the journal are Prof. Sir Nigel Rodley, University of Essex, UK, and Prof.
Yuval Shany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

The journal publishes articles, shorter pieces addressing topical issues under the rubric of ‘opposing views’, as well as book reviews and review essays. We aim to present scholarship that is representative in terms of gender, geographical distribution and viewpoint. We accept submissions on a rolling basis.

Consideration will normally be given only to original material that has not previously been published. All submissions are subjected to a double-blind review process, involving at least two specialists in the field. For further details on our publication policy and process see here.

For queries and additional information, please contact the academic editor, Dr. Yaël Ronen, at yael.ronen@mail.huji.ac.il.