Work On! 2nd Annual “Revisiting the Role of International Law in National Security” Workshop

notes_croppedWork On! is an occasional item about workshops, roundtables, and other fora that do not necessarily include publication:

► The International Committee of the Red Cross’s Delegation in Washington along with the faculty at Loyola Law School Los Angeles, Stanford Law and Cardozo Law are hosting the 2nd Annual “Revisiting the Role of International Law in National Security” workshops on May 18th, 2017 at Cardozo Law School in New York City, USA. The theme’s aim is to drive Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 11.54.37.pngdiscussions of public international law, including international criminal law, into conversations (in the U.S. in particular) on national security issues and situations of armed conflicts. There is also an invitation to submit an abstract or draft f article for discussion at the workshop. Deadline for submissions is Monday March 6, 2017. For more details click here.

Write On! Palestine Yearbook, Hague Justice Journal & Race, Gender & Law

backlit_keyboardThis installment of Write On!, our periodic compilation of calls for papers, includes calls to present at The Canadian Journal of Women and Law, The Hague Justice Journal and the Palestine Yearbook of International Law, as follows:

► The Canadian Journal of Women and Law seeks submissions for a special issue 30(2) to be published in December 2018. The theme is Race, Gender, and Law: A tribute to the scholarship of Sherene Razack (guest edited by Gada Mahrouse, Carmela Murdocca, andLEslie Thielen-Wilson). Deadline is September 1, 2017.

► The Hague Justice Journal First Edition in Association with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia seeks submissions for its 2017 volume. Submissions will include selected papers from the ICTY Legacy Conference to be held June 23-24, 2017 in Sarajevo, Bosnia. The theme is ICTY’s legacy in this it’s final year of operations.  Deadline is August 1, 2017.

► The Palestine Yearbook of International Law is seeking submissions for the 2017 Volume XX. It is a general call for papers but particular welcome is made to submissions which focus on themes associated with three anniversaries relevant to Palestine, marked in 2017: the 100 year anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, the 70 year anniversary of the UN Plan of Partition for Palestine, and the 50th anniversary of the occupation of the west Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Deadline is March 15, 2017.

Write On! Call for Papers: Gender Implications of the Law of the Sea

Exploring the Human Element of the Oceans: The Gender Implications of the Law of the Sea

25-26 May 2017
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy

Call for Papers

The School of Law, University of Milano-Bicocca is organising a two-days conference on the gender implications of the law of the sea, to be held in Milan (Italy) on 25-26 May 2017.

Concept

The conference stems from an empirical consideration: international law of the sea, including maritime law, has been traditionally silent about the role played by women at sea, and this is very much the case still today. Regulation is scant and scholarly research almost non-existent. The growing interest of scholars in the analysis of law of the sea and maritime law from a more human-oriented approach, in an attempt to integrate the human element into the law of the sea rules, has led to multiple interconnections between these two fields and international human rights law. However, none of these efforts have broached the impact of gender and women at sea. Yet, the issue is far from idle: women are increasingly accessing maritime careers and states and private actors are faced with the ensuing issues. In particular, the contribution of women in small- and medium-scale commercial fisheries is paramount, although often unrecognised and unregulated. The role of women as active agents and participants has been overlooked and international law of the sea still largely qualifies as a “male affair”. At the same time,

women constitute also a vulnerable group in international law of the sea, as they are more likely to be subject to trafficking, torture, and sexual abuses at seas, whether they end up there as seafarers, members of national navies, passengers or victims of trafficking.

Furthermore, after the 1995 Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action set the agenda for reaching women’s rights, gender equality has been placed at the frontline on the 2000 Millennium Development Goals. The MDG call upon the UN, the international community and civil society to adopt action and policies of gender mainstreaming tailored to achieve the equality commitments. At the institutional level, the need to recognise and strengthen the capacity of women in the maritime sector is currently addressed by the International Maritime Organization, the International Labour Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization, and has been recently recalled also by the Secretary General of the United Nations in his 2014 and 2015 Reports to the General Assembly on Oceans and Law of the Sea.

The purpose of the conference is therefore to open up this field of research to the academic and professional communities, by mapping the existing international legal framework and discussing whether existing norms provide adequate protection for both women and men at sea and sufficient tools to strengthen their capacity to engage in a productive manner in this field. Questions that the conference intends to explore include: Is international law of the sea gender neutral, or does it reflect a male perspective that eventually marginalises women? What can be said about the role of international human rights law in providing protection to women at sea? Should a re- evaluation or re-interpretation of the system be taken into account in order to integrate a gender perspective? What are the most relevant areas in the law of the sea and maritime law where women play a major role or face particular hardships? How can their role be strengthened and women themselves be empowered?

The conference convenors welcome contributions on the gender implications of the law of the sea. We are particularly interested in international, comparative and EU perspectives on the following topics:

  •   International law of the sea and gender. Is the law of the sea gender neutral? Could/should feminist legal theory engage more with the topic? Would law of the sea benefit from such an analytical approach?
  • Torture, sexual abuses and trafficking at sea. Human trafficking, forced labour and slavery are endemic phenomena in the fisheries sector in some geographical areas; men and women, often due to their ethnicity, are sold and forced to work under physical and psychological threat. Women are the most vulnerable subject to torture, rape and sexual abuses. Do existing international norms adequately address the issue? What is peculiar about torture and sexual abuses when they occur at sea? Does international human rights law constitute a sufficient ground to tackle issues faced by women at sea or does it reinforce the depiction of women as victims rather than active participants within the international law of the sea framework?

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Write On! Call for Submissions: Summer ’17 Issue of Trade, Law and Development

Call for Submissions: Summer ’17

 The Board of Editors of Trade, Law and Development [TL&D] is pleased to invite original, unpublished manuscripts for publication in the Summer ‘17 Special Issue of the Journal on Recent Regionalism (Vol. 9, No. 1). The manuscripts may be in the form of Articles, Notes, Comments, and Book Reviews.

TL&D aims to generate and sustain a democratic debate on emerging issues in international economic law, with a special focus on the developing world. Towards these ends, we have published works by noted scholars such as Prof. Petros Mavroidis, Prof. Mitsuo Matsuhita, Prof. Raj Bhala, Prof. Joel Trachtman, Gabrielle Marceau, Simon Lester, Prof. Bryan Mercurio, Prof. E.U. Petersmann and Prof. M. Sornarajah among others.

TL&D also has the distinction of being ranked the best journal in India across all fields of law and the 10th best trade journal worldwide by Washington and Lee University, School of Law for five consecutive years (2011-15) [The Washington & Lee Rankings are considered to be the most comprehensive in this regard].

 

For more information, please go through the submission guidelines available at www.tradelawdevelopment.com or write to us at editors@tradelawdevelopment.com.

 

Last Date for Submissions: February 15, 2017

Write On! Call for Papers: U.S. Naval War College

U.S. Naval War College (NWC) is issuing a ‘call for papers’ in preparation of its fifth annual Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Conference to be held, August 2017, at the college.

In an effort to gather theoretical and practical ideas from a wider audience not normally represented in a limited conference format, the conference series chair is soliciting papers from academics, researchers, military personnel, non-governmental organizations and individuals who have an interest or experience in issues pertaining to WPS.

“Conferences have limited room for participants,” said Mary Raum, NWC professor and chair of the WPS Conference series. “To have available, online and in the networked world, some quality thoughts on components of WPS from thinkers and practitioners who have a direct tie to the subjects being discussed is an invaluable resource.

“This call for papers will allow for a broader reach in exchanging ideas and enable us to network on a global scale – a first step for formalizing the sharing of ideas allied with conference precepts.”

Since the inception of the U.S. National Action Plan on WPS in 2011, NWC has been at the forefront of exploration into national and international issues involving WPS, working toward the goal of empowering women in conflict prevention and peace.

According to Raum, the conference continues to grow in perspective and scope to ensure the participation and inclusion of ideas from sister services and international partners across the globe.

“Any person tasked with protecting the national interest must be aware of the linkages between the security of women and the security of states,” said Raum. “They should also be aware of the broad-level interconnections of the role of WPS with military, economic and social freedoms around the globe.”

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Work On! Director of Programs (TCC / NGO), Human Rights Program, The Carter Center

Job Description

Summary: 
The Director is responsible for designing and implementing activities related to the human rights portfolio, through high-level contacts with representatives of governments, non-governmental organizations and international organizations, including the United Nations. The Director, in collaboration with the Senior Policy Advisor on Human Rights and Special Representative on Women and Girls (SPA/SR) and other responsible Carter Center staff, will be relied upon for in-depth analysis of international issues that impact on international and national human rights protection systems in order to guide the Center’s strategic direction and corresponding programs on human rights issues, including issues related to women and gender. The Director, Human Rights reports to the Vice President, Peace Programs.

The position will be responsible to strengthen, in consultation with other experts in the international human rights field and in collaboration with peace and health practitioners, the Center’s policy and agenda for the advancement and protection of human rights activities. The Director must maintain a contemporary understanding of the most pressing issues and be able to mobilize actions that are appropriate for immediate, medium, and long-term strategies. Additionally, drawing on the advice of the SPA/SR, the Director will be expected to reinforce the Center’s engagement on women’s rights issues.

The Director has the responsibility for managing the day-to-day staffing, operations, budgets, planning group meetings, annual conferences and related travel and activities associated with the Human Rights Program. Tasks include project development, implementation and management, proposal development, budget planning and tracking, project promotion, report production, and networking. The Director will liaise and collaborate closely with the SPA/SR as well as with the Design, Monitoring and Evaluation Advisor. The Director will supervise program staff, interns, and volunteers as needed.

Minimum Qualifications: The Director must be well accomplished in the field of international human rights.  Juris Doctor or Master’s degree in a relevant field and a minimum of ten years of program related experience in the field of international human rights are required.  The individual must have well-established relationships with high-level representatives of the U.S. and foreign governments, intergovernmental organizations, especially the United Nations, and international and local human rights defender non-governmental organizations. Proven strong leadership and management skills, including solid program design and strategy development experience, supervision of staff, budget management, as well as solid understanding of program resource needs for effective monitoring and evaluation is essential. S/He must demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills, and familiarity with new communication technologies and social media. Fluency in English and one other U.N. language, preferably French as well as extensive international Human Rights experience in one or more developing countries is preferred. 

Interested? Apply here:  https://sjobs.brassring.com/TGnewUI/Search/Home/Home?partnerid=25066&siteid=5043

Call for Submissions-Race, Gender and Law: A tribute to the scholarship of Sherene Razack- Canadian Journal of Women and the Law

Call for Submissions – Race, Gender and Law: A tribute to the scholarship of Sherene Razack

http://bit.ly/cjwlcfp

The Canadian Journal of Women and Law (CJWL) seeks submissions for a special issue 30(2) to be published in December 2018 on Race, Gender and Law: A tribute to the scholarship of Sherene Razack (guest edited by Gada Mahrouse, Carmela Murdocca, and Leslie Thielen-Wilson). The deadline for submitting articles for this special issue is September 1, 2017. 

Dr. Sherene Razack is one of Canada’s leading critical race feminist theorists. She is especially known for developing an analytic that shows: 1. how racial violence is often legally and socially authorized and is integral to the making of states; and 2. how racial violence is gendered and sexualized. This special issue is in celebration of the 20th anniversary of her ground-breaking book Looking White People in the Eye (now in its fourth edition) and her important and on-going contributions to the interdisciplinary field of critical race feminisms and socio-legal studies. We invite articles in English and French from academics, legal scholars, educators, and activists, working in the areas of gender, race, and law. We are interested in receiving articles that are explicitly informed by Razack’s methodology or any other important aspect of her work.

Submissions should be no more than 35 pages (10,000 words) and should conform to the Style Guide available on our website: http://bit.ly/cjwlsubmit.  Please send articles in word format indicating it is for the special issue on “Race, Gender and the Law.” to: cjwl-rfd@uottawa.ca
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